Lecture 23b - Making sense of Gauss Law E field lines start...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–6. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: Making sense of Gauss Law E field lines start on + charge, end on charge Think about a box with field lines going in and out of the surface # of lines out # of lines in Q inside the box flux out flux in Q inside Net flux Q inside net flux = Q inside / 0 (Gauss) add flux thru each surface of the box to get the net flux: E 1 A 1 + E 2 A 2 + E 3 A 3 + = Q inside / E i A i = Q inside / 0 ? = ?? For small bits of surface dA, the sum becomes an integral over the surface Gauss: Net Flux through a surface depends only on the charge inside =E(4 r 2 ) Consider a Gaussian sphere around a point charge The flux through the spherical surface is Applications of Gauss Law 1) We can use Gauss Law to prove some important properties of metals 2) In situations with a high degree of symmetry, Gauss's Law can allow for a quick calculation of the E-field. A charged isolated conductor Q: Say we add some excess electrons to a copper ball. How would the extra electrons distribute themselves? A. Uniformly throughout B. On the surface only 5 Conductors in Electrostatic Equilibrium E = 0 inside a conductor in equilibrium !...
View Full Document

Page1 / 20

Lecture 23b - Making sense of Gauss Law E field lines start...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 6. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online