Lecture 2 - THE MEDIA AND THE EMERGENCY DEPARTMENT Nicole...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–11. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
THE MEDIA AND THE EMERGENCY DEPARTMENT Nicole A. Tenn-Lyn HLST 1011 January 14th, 2011
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
OUTLINE Why is media reporting important? Why do stories about the ED get into media? What is newsworthy? Who cares about how the media portrays the ED? Does media affect public perceptions? Is reality TV any better than fiction? Where do journalists/writers get their information?
Background image of page 2
WHY IS MEDIA REPORTING IMPORTANT? Source of information about health and health care for large segments of public Can affect priorities of politicians Can influence use of health facilities, drugs, etc. May increase tensions between groups, e.g., doctors/nurses and paramedics Can change affect relationship between health professionals and patients Important source of news for the media (helps media generate revenue)
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
DIFFERENCES BETWEEN FICTION AND REALITY
Background image of page 4
5 FROM DR. KILDARE TO GREY’S ANATOMY Ann Emerg Med Sept 2010 56:21A-23A TV physicians change real pt expectations Cultivation theory: “over time, the more people watch TV, the more likely the views and beliefs portrayed on television begin to affect people’s perceptions” The more people watch, the more realistic they think the show is, even with the disconnect between drama and reality
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
6 EVOLUTION OF THE TV DRAMA DECAD E EXAMPLE FOCU S PUBLIC PERCEPTION 1960s Dr. Kildare Ben Casey Patient Gifted, godlike Gathers info 1970s- 1980s MASH St. Elsewhere MD Fast-paced romance 1990s ER Chicago Hope MD private life Weak, insecure Cold,
Background image of page 6
7 POTENTIAL CONSEQUENCES Dissatisfaction with care Disruptive behaviour Complaints to hospital, CPSO Litigation Physicians need to be cognizant of these perceptions and explain to patients Why case will not resolve quickly Why time moves more slowly in reality Team-based approach to care that MD is a part of but does not lead
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Background image of page 8
PORTRAYAL OF CPR 72-90% of patients learn about CPR from TV European study found that there is a small but statistically significant relationship between watching medical fiction on TV and estimation of success of CPR (basic CPR- training did not give people a more realistic view) How will this view of the success of CPR affect communications between doctors/nurses and the families of patients who die in the emergency department?
Background image of page 9

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
LOOK LIKE ON TV? Long-term survival rate on TV
Background image of page 10
Image of page 11
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 02/05/2011 for the course ECON 1000 taught by Professor Paschakis during the Spring '08 term at York University.

Page1 / 42

Lecture 2 - THE MEDIA AND THE EMERGENCY DEPARTMENT Nicole...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 11. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online