RevisedCh11Notes

RevisedCh11Notes - Chapter11:TheEconomicsofImmigration

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Chapter 11: The Economics of Immigration A Profile of Immigration to Canada Textbook Figure 11.1 shows the level and patterns of immigration by source region since 1955  o up until the mid-1980s, immigration levels fluctuated sharply with the business cycle and  immigration levels were significantly curtailed during recessions  o since the late 1980s, Canada has admitted over 200,000 immigrants per year (except for  1998 and 1999) and immigration levels did not significantly decline during the recession in  the early 1990s  o flows in the late 1950s, the mid-1960s, and the mid-1970s; on a per capita basis, recent  immigration levels are actually lower than in earlier years the source regions have changed dramatically; compared to the mid-1960s when the main source  countries were the U.K., the U.S. and western Europe, Asia is now the main source region for  immigrants to Canada (also see Table 11.1) 
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
as shown in Textbook Figure 11.2, immigrants are concentrated in major metropolitan areas in  Canada; over 40% of Toronto residents and over 35% of Vancouver residents were born outside  Canada (93% of recent immigrants live in the 19 cities listed in Figure 11.2)  for many facts and figures about Canadian immigration, click on: http://www.cic.gc.ca/english/research/menu-fact.html#2006 for the most recent annual data on the number of immigrants to Canada and the provinces in which  they reside, click on: http://www.statcan.ca/english/Pgdb/demo33a.htm  
Background image of page 2
for 1996 census data on Canadian and provincial populations by ethnic origin, click on: http://www.statcan.ca/english/Pgdb/demo28a.htm   for 1996 census data on metropolitan area populations by ethnic origin, click on: http://www.statcan.ca/english/Pgdb/demo28d.htm The Policy Environment the Canadian government has two main policy instruments for controlling immigration:  o setting a target number of immigrants each year; whether the target is achieved depends  on the supply of people who want to immigrate to Canada  o determining who among the set of potential immigrants is admitted; the government can  affect the mix of immigrants by determining how many immigrants will be admitted in the  assessed and nonassessed classes the assessed classes are those immigrants who are evaluated on the basis of their likely 
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 02/05/2011 for the course ECON 3240 taught by Professor Noordeh during the Winter '11 term at York University.

Page1 / 8

RevisedCh11Notes - Chapter11:TheEconomicsofImmigration

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online