Chapter 6 notes

Chapter 6 notes - Weight Management Body Mass Index (BMI)...

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Weight Management Body Mass Index (BMI) and Health Body Mass Index (BMI) and Health •Overweight is defined as excess weight characterized by a BMI greater than 25 but less than 30. –While not necessarily harmful, as a group, overweight individuals face a higher risk of type II diabetes and cardiovascular disease risk factors. Approx of 65% of US men and 55% of US women are classified as overweight Obesity is defined as excess weight characterized by a BMI equal to or greater than 30. –Obesity is the second leading cause of preventable death in the US. (Smoking is the first) –The prevalence of obesity is higher among ethnic groups, especially African American and Hispanic Americans. –Between 1960 and 2000 overall obesity in the U.S. increased from 13% to 24% (most increase in the 1990s). (Spike in 1990s can be because of fast food, technology (video games), internet, removal of recess and PE) About 35% of Americans are considered obese All States report at least 15% of their population being obese Obesity: A major health hazard of epidemic proportions in modern society. Obesity: A major health hazard of epidemic proportions in modern society. •An estimated 97 million Americans are overweight and 30 million are obese. –63% of men and 55% of women are overweight. –21% of men and 27% of women are obese. •Research indicates that individuals, age 30-49 that are 30 or more pounds over normal body weight lose about 7 years of life. The Obesity Epidemic The Obesity Epidemic •The American Heart Association has identified obesity as one of the six major factors for coronary Heart Disease. – ~14% of all cancer deaths in Men and 20% in women are related to current overweight and obesity patterns in the United States. (colon and breast cancer) –Obesity is more prevalent than smoking (19%), poverty (14%), and problem drinking (6%). Critical Thinking Critical Thinking •Do you consider yourself overweight? If so, how long have you had a weight problem, what attempts have you made to lose weight, and what has worked best for you? Tolerable Weight Tolerable Weight •“Ideal” body shapes, physiques, and proportions seen in magazines –are very rare –are often achieved by airbrushing and medical reconstruction –are maintained by individuals who abuse their bodies with medication, starvation, and purging
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•Failure to attain a “perfect body” may lead to eating disorders •Only a small fraction of the population has the genes for a “perfect body.” •The goal in weight management is not to reach an ideal shape and weight. Be realistic and aim for a tolerable weight. •For most, a health-fitness rather than a physical- or sport-fitness goal is a more practical
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Chapter 6 notes - Weight Management Body Mass Index (BMI)...

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