Dec 2003 - THE ASSOCIATION OF BUSINESS EXECUTIVES...

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THE ASSOCIATION OF BUSINESS EXECUTIVES CERTIFICATE Introduction to Business Communication afternoon 4 December 2003 1 Time allowed: 3 hours . 2 Answer any FIVE questions, at least three of which must be from Section A. Do not answer more than TWO questions from Section B. (If you wish, you may answer all FIVE questions from Section A and none from Section B.) 3 All questions carry 20 marks . Marks for subdivisions of questions are shown in brackets. 4 No books, dictionaries, notes or any other written materials are allowed in this examination. 5 Calculators are allowed providing they are not programmable and cannot store or recall information. Electronic dictionaries and personal organisers are NOT allowed. 6 Candidates who break ABE regulations, or commit any misconduct, will be disqualified from the examinations. IBC
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Section A Answer at least THREE questions from this section Q1 (a) Write a summary of the passage which follows, in not more than 180 words . (12 marks) Life, it has been said, is just a series of meetings, and there is an element of truth in this. From earliest childhood we are interacting with other people in order to get things done, and we quickly learn the techniques of how to obtain our desires when we are talking to others. In the business world nearly all formal meetings that are held, are held because there are specific problems to be solved within the workplace. But although all of the participants as individuals are normally quite skilled in the art of conversation, not all of these meetings actually achieve their goals, as we all know from experience. So why is this? We often make the mistake of assuming that a meeting is just another type of conversation, but in fact it is not. Conversations can often be circular and repetitive, even casual, and can take a long time to get anywhere. In a good meeting, more ground will be covered in the same amount of time, and this sense of rapid progress will allow everyone to enjoy the meeting because it is achieving something. This sense of enjoyment is important, because people who are enjoying the meeting will be more likely to make useful contributions to it. We have all seen people in meetings who have lost interest and waste their time doodling while being totally unaware of what is going on around them. This is why a formal structure is necessary. Meetings work well only if the roles of everyone present are clear, and are kept to during the meeting. This demands a formal structure. The agenda needs to be clear so that the discussions are focused, and the chairman needs to ensure that all who want to speak are given the chance, and that everyone remains involved. At the same time he should ensure that no time is wasted with irrelevant matters.
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The most productive meetings are those in which all the participants can feed on other people’s ideas and develop them. Very often we find that we cannot solve a problem on our own, but when other people with different perspectives can contribute their ideas to the debate, solutions often follow – sometimes unexpectedly!
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This note was uploaded on 04/04/2008 for the course MANAGEMENT MGT1200 taught by Professor Roopchand during the Summer '08 term at Abraham Baldwin Agricultural College.

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Dec 2003 - THE ASSOCIATION OF BUSINESS EXECUTIVES...

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