Gender and Global Health - Special Populations (Gender)

Gender and Global Health - Special Populations (Gender) -...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–8. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Special Populations: Women’s Health
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Definition of “Special Populations” The term “special populations” refers to groups with  difficult to treat problems or expensive diseases, or  limited resources. High levels of need for health services , including the elderly, pregnant women, disabled, and autistic children, etc. Special health care needs or expensive diseases, such as people with end-state renal disease, mental illness, HIV/AIDS, etc. Limited resources or social exclusion such as the unemployed, families with low incomes, Native Americans, minority Americans, etc.
Background image of page 2
Characteristics of Special Populations Populations of both developing and developed nations are highly heterogeneous and include groups with very different health risk profiles. Groups that lack wealth and power include, among others The lower social classes who are socially marginalized and who often live in favelas. Indigenous populations who are often stigmatized and disadvantaged. Victims of natural disasters and refugees. Racial and ethnic minority groups. Poor and uneducated women who live in patriarchal societies
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Major Examples of Vulnerable Groups in the World Today Turks in Germany who came as guest workers and  who are now second class citizens. Algerians in France. Aborigines in Australia and the Mapuche Indians in  Chile. Native peoples in Canada and the United States. Women from poor countries who are trafficked for  sexual purposes. “Les Miserables” or individuals who live in sub- human conditions of poverty. 
Background image of page 4
Do you agree with the following: Within societies or communities where women have  more equitable political and economic status with men,  and ample reproductive rights, are women healthier, less  often disabled, and longer lived compared with women  who live in places with less gender equality? A. Yes B. No
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
New Morbidities: Violence Against Women Wives would experience less wife beating in states with gender equity due to  three factors: 1. Husband’s historically protected rights to use physical force against their  wives would be weaker 2. Women’s greater economic independence would help them to leave  abusive relationships 3. More services and protections would be available to women in more  equitable states Under conditions of greater gender equity, there is less violence against wives. 
Background image of page 6
Why are the most marginalized are at greatest risk? Source: Source: Women, Migration, Conflict and Risk for HIV Women, Migration, Conflict and Risk for HIV (2009). Springer. (2009). Springer.
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 8
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 02/05/2011 for the course UGS 303 taught by Professor Foster during the Spring '08 term at University of Texas at Austin.

Page1 / 29

Gender and Global Health - Special Populations (Gender) -...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 8. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online