Special Populations (The Uninsured) - US Health Reform Part 1

Special Populations (The Uninsured) - US Health Reform Part 1

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Is the President’s legislative agenda for national health care reform? A. An urgent priority B. Somewhat Important C. Low Priority D. No Priority
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In the U.S., Health care accounts for Five percent of GDP Ten percent of GDP Sixteen percent of GDP Twenty percent of GDP
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The main goal to improve US health care should be to… Democrats Republicans Independents 3% 34% 64% 2% 71% 26% 4% 53% 43% Don’t know/ Refused Source: Kaiser Health Tracking Poll: Election 2008 (conducted June 3 - 8, 2008) Partisans Disagree: Main Goal Should Be…… …make health insurance more available & affordable in the private marketplace, even if everyone doesn’t get covered …make sure that EVERYONE is covered by health insurance
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Basic Principles Related to Health Coverage For individuals and families health care coverage should be: Universal Continuous Affordable For society the health insurance program must be: Affordable and equitable Sustainable in terms of efficiency and simplicity Designed to enhance the well-being and productivity of the population Source: Institute of Medicine, 2004
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Major Social Objectives Equity (100% coverage)—No one refused care because of the inability to pay Existing proposals could get close to this but with massive duplication of effort and huge administrative costs. Efficiency—Developing a system that does not drain off a massive fraction of GNP Only a single-payer approach or a centralized administrative structure could result in system-wide economic and technical rationalization
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How much impact will the various reform proposals have? Incomplete Coverage Universal Coverage (about 47 million uninsured) (No one uninsured) Unaffordable for many No cost to patient Continuity not guaranteed Coverage is continuous For society aggregate cost Planning and rationing hard to contain lower aggregate cost The general health not Public health potentially maximized maximized
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Proposals: From least to most comprehensive Status Quo Extension of existing public programs (Medicare, Medicaid) on a voluntary basis Employer mandates with tax incentives, premium subsidies, and individual mandate Individual mandate and tax credit Single payer
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U.S. Health Care Reform Prospects and Challenges in a New Century
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This note was uploaded on 02/05/2011 for the course UGS 303 taught by Professor Foster during the Spring '08 term at University of Texas at Austin.

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Special Populations (The Uninsured) - US Health Reform Part 1

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