Dec 2004 - THE ASSOCIATION OF BUSINESS EXECUTIVES...

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THE ASSOCIATION OF BUSINESS EXECUTIVES CERTIFICATE Introduction to Business Communication afternoon 2 December 2004 1 Time allowed: 3 hours . 2 Answer any FIVE questions, at least three of which must be from Section A. Do not answer more than TWO questions from Section B. (If you wish, you may answer all FIVE questions from Section A and none from Section B.) 3 All questions carry 20 marks . Marks for subdivisions of questions are shown in brackets. 4 No books, dictionaries, notes or any other written materials are allowed in this examination. 5 Calculators are allowed providing they are not programmable and cannot store or recall information. Electronic dictionaries and personal organisers are NOT allowed. All workings should be shown. 6 Candidates who break ABE regulations, or commit any misconduct, will be disqualified from the examinations. IBC
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Section A Answer at least THREE questions from this section Q1 (a) Read the following article, and write a summary of its main points in no more than 170 words. Try to use your own words as far as possible, and avoid copying large portions of the passage. (12 marks) Since the early 1990s, when worldwide use of the International Computer Network (universally known as the Internet) began to grow rapidly, we have seen more and more applications becoming available to ordinary members of the public. The most frequent uses of the internet are: to gather information by visiting relevant websites; to send and receive e-mails; and to conduct business transactions. It is with the third of these applications that this article is primarily concerned. The buying and selling of goods and services over the internet is commonly known as e-commerce (an abbreviation of “electronic commerce”). The annual growth in the number of transactions carried out by this means is continuing to grow hugely year on year, and shows no signs of slowing down in the foreseeable future. The single most important reason why more and more people are choosing to use this method of doing business is, quite simply, convenience. One can imagine the case of the customer who wants to purchase, for example, a new television set. In the past, this customer would perhaps have had to spend most of a day visiting a number of different shops in order to compare models, prices and availability. Now, with e-commerce, all this research can be done in a matter of a few minutes without ever leaving home. All aspects of competing products and suppliers can be compared, a choice made, and delivery arranged with just a few clicks of a mouse button. All major retailers, recognising the importance of e-commerce to the growth of their business, have now established websites where customers can purchase goods.
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In exactly the same way, theatre tickets can be booked, and a graphic on the computer screen will show you exactly which seats are being purchased – something which could never be done if you were ordering tickets over the telephone. We can arrange holidays on the
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This note was uploaded on 04/04/2008 for the course MANAGEMENT MGT1200 taught by Professor Roopchand during the Summer '08 term at Abraham Baldwin Agricultural College.

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Dec 2004 - THE ASSOCIATION OF BUSINESS EXECUTIVES...

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