7-2 - Chapter 7.2: The Definition of Probability The...

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Unformatted text preview: Chapter 7.2: The Definition of Probability The probability of an event occurring is a number between 0 and 1. We can think of probability as a measurement of likelihood. The larger an events probability is, the more likely that event is to occur. One way to determine probability is empirically (experimentally). We can repeat an experiment many times, and calculate the portion of trials in which the event in question occurs. For example, with a fair coin, we would find that over many flips, the coin will turn up heads about half the time. Another way to determine probability is theoretically . We determine the probability of an event occurring by using properties of probability, rather than by performing experiments. Given an event E , the notation P ( E ) refers to the probability that event E will occur. P is sometimes referred to as a probability func- tion . All probability functions have the following properties: 1. P ( S ) = 1. 2. P ( ) = 0. 3. For any event E , 0 P ( E ) 1. A simple event is an event which contains exactly one sample point. Example: Suppose a coin is flipped three times, and the sequence of heads and tails is noted. List the simple events associated with this experiment....
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This note was uploaded on 02/05/2011 for the course MATH 377 taught by Professor Stephenlang during the Spring '11 term at University of Victoria.

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7-2 - Chapter 7.2: The Definition of Probability The...

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