David Hume and overview

David Hume and overview - What is the free will debate? 3...

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What is the free will debate? 3 main stand points Libertarianism free will Hard determinism baron dolbec Compatabalism. Argue for what you take to believe is the strongest position. Defend position against other 2 positions April 15 2008 Chris Liu David Hume Compatablisits – Freedom and Determinism (free will is a certain type of determinism) Hume Frankfurt Icompatibilists-- Libertarians Reid James Hard (Holbach) Classical Compatabilism Freedom is nothing more than an agent’s ability to do what she wishes in the absence of impediments that would otherwise stand in her way. Here, Freedom encounters “No stop in doing what he has the will desire, or inclination to do.” Thomas Hobbes (1588-1679) Doing what one wants to do! Free will is simply the unencumbered ability of agent to do what she wants.
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Hume Imagine that your actions are not determined by what events came before. Then your actions are, it seems, completely random! How can we hold some one responsible for an action that randomly occurred? Are not random actions the actions of the insane? For Hume free actions are not random , but fully intelligible in the light of the agent’s character. That is to say, if you know the agents characters (Desires, Preferences, Values, etc.) Well enough, you will probably be able to predict what he or she will do on a particular occasion, Example if you know someone is a kind and caring person, you could predict that he or she will help someone in the right circumstances. Quantum Mechanics?
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David Hume and overview - What is the free will debate? 3...

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