June 2007 - THE ASSOCIATION OF BUSINESS EXECUTIVES...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
THE ASSOCIATION OF BUSINESS EXECUTIVES CERTIFICATE Introduction to Business Communication afternoon 7 June 2007 1 Time allowed: 3 hours . 2 Answer any FIVE questions, at least THREE of which must be from Section A. Do not answer more than TWO questions from Section B. (If you wish, you may answer all FIVE questions from Section A and none from Section B.) 3 All questions carry 20 marks . Marks for subdivisions of questions are shown in brackets. 4 No books, dictionaries, notes or any other written materials are allowed in this examination. 5 Calculators are allowed providing they are not programmable and cannot store or recall information. Electronic dictionaries and personal organisers are NOT allowed. All workings should be shown. 6 Candidates who break ABE regulations, or commit any misconduct, will be disqualified from the examinations. 7 Question papers must not be removed from the Examination Hall. IBC
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Section A Answer at least THREE questions from this section Q1 (a) Summarise the main points of the following article in not more than 200 words. (13 marks) In recent years, there have been growing fears about the effects on the Earth of a phenomenon known as “global warming.” Now, these fears have been confirmed by an official study. A panel of some 3000 scientists, called the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), was set up by the United Nations to investigate whether or not global warming is a reality, and to assess what its likely impact might be. The study was by far the most complete investigation ever undertaken into the Earth’s climate. The research lasted over three years in total, and was based on millions of measurements taken from locations all over the planet. The researchers measured rainfall and average temperatures on every continent, including Antarctica, in every type of landscape and at every altitude. They entered their data into sophisticated computer programs, which analysed the figures and produced projections for the future. The conclusions do not look good for the planet. Within two generations, they say, if nothing is done to check what seems to be an unstoppable rise in the Earth’s temperatures, the consequences will be devastating for life as we know it. Across the continent of Africa, they predict, deserts will continue to spread and there will be less agricultural land for the rapidly expanding population. In Asia, climate change will dry up much land that is currently fertile, so crop production will decrease and famines will be certain. In Arabia it is predicted that fresh water will be in such short supply that wars will be fought over who controls it. Australia will also become a land of drought.
Background image of page 2
As temperatures rise, the polar icecaps will continue to melt, and sea levels will rise. The Antarctic ice- sheet holds more than fifty percent of all the Earth’s fresh water, and if this melts the world’s sea levels will rise by as much as a metre. The consequences of this will be disastrous on a scale never seen by mankind
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 15

June 2007 - THE ASSOCIATION OF BUSINESS EXECUTIVES...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online