freezing+point - 3. For each unknown solution, record the...

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“3. For each unknown solution, record the mass of water, the mass of the unknown compound and calculate the molality. (a) unknown #1 (b) unknown #2” You should have the mass of the water and the mass of the unknown compound from your measurements. To find the molality, you would use the equation: You know the change in temperature and you know that water has a Kf of 1.86 °C/m. Plug these numbers in to solve for the molality of the solutions: Also include the mass of the unknowns as 2.00 g and the mass of water as 10.0 g. “4. Calculate the molecular weight, MW, in g/mole for each unknown. (a) unknown #1 (b) unknown #2” Molality is the moles of solute per kg of solvent. If you multiply the molality by the kg of solvent, you will have the number of moles. Divide the mass of unknown by the number of moles to find the molecular weight.
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“5. If you are told that one of the unknowns is glucose, C HO , with a molecular weight of 180.16 g/mole, which would you say it is? “ The first unknown with a mass of 180.2 g/mol most closely matches the mass of glucose.
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This note was uploaded on 02/06/2011 for the course CHEM 115L taught by Professor Nakkiew,pichaya during the Spring '10 term at Grand Canyon.

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freezing+point - 3. For each unknown solution, record the...

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