ISSUE ANALYSIS TECHNIQUES

ISSUE ANALYSIS TECHNIQUES - ISSUE ANALYSIS I The following...

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ISSUE ANALYSIS I - The following lecture and techniques are adapted from Argument and Argumentation by Jean Saindon. What is issue analysis? - Issue analysis is a technique for analyzing a topic or body of literature to identify and contrast the issues, positions, and arguments found within it. It involves: 1. Identifying an issue 2. Finding the possible positions on that issue 3. Identifying the arguments in favour of these positions 4. Assessing the relative strengths of these arguments. - There are two main purposes for which one might use issue analysis: - The first is to understand the “geography” of a particular issue - that is, the different positions on it and the merits of the arguments in favour of it. - Here our goal is simply to understand the issue better. - The second is to prepare an argumentative essay or position paper on the issue. - By analyzing the various positions on the issue, we can determine which position is best supported and how best to argue for it. - By the time we’ve finished the issue analysis, most of the work for the paper has already been done. - This is how we’re going to be using it here. - Sound useful? What is an issue? - An issue is a point of contention within a given context between at least two disputants, inquirers or points of view. - It is a point over which there is some disagreement as to its acceptability or a problem over which there is some dispute as to the best method of addressing it. - If there is no disagreement, it is not an issue. - “Is euthanasia performed in Canada?” is not an issue. It is a request for information. - “Should euthanasia be performed in Canada?” is an issue. It is a point of contention with at least two different sides. - An issue is normally a central point on which a dispute or inquiry hinges. The issue has to be interesting or important enough that people would bother debating it, and typically other disputes or courses of action would be determined or at least influenced by the answer we give. - An issue is normally phrased in the form of a question, e.g. “Should we decriminalize
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This note was uploaded on 02/07/2011 for the course MODR 1760 taught by Professor Camelacircelli during the Spring '11 term at York University.

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ISSUE ANALYSIS TECHNIQUES - ISSUE ANALYSIS I The following...

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