{[ promptMessage ]}

Bookmark it

{[ promptMessage ]}

Cellular Automata Methods in Mathematical Physics

Cellular Automata Methods in Mathematical Physics -...

Info icon This preview shows page 1. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: Cellular Automata Methods in Mathematical Physics B.S. Physics with Astrophysics Option and Mathematics and B.S. Computer Science with Scienti c Programming Applications Option, New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology, Socorro, New Mexico 1982 Submitted to the Department of Physics in partial ful llment of the requirements of the degree of Doctor of Philosophy at the MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY May 1994 c 1994 Mark A. Smith. All rights reserved. The author hereby grants to MIT permission to reproduce and distribute publicly paper and electronic copies of this thesis document in whole or in part, and to grant others the right to do so. Mark Andrew Smith by Keywords: cellular automata, physical modeling, mathematical physics, reversibility, maximum entropy, lattice gases, relativity, polymer simulation, Monte Carlo methods, parallel computing, computational physics 2 Cellular Automata Methods in Mathematical Physics by Mark Andrew Smith Submitted to the Department of Physics on May 16th, 1994, in partial ful llment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy Abstract Cellular automata CA are fully discrete, spatially-distributed dynamical systems which can serve as an alternative framework for mathematical descriptions of physical systems. Furthermore, they constitute intrinsically parallel models of computation which can be e ciently realized with special-purpose cellular automata machines. The basic objective of this thesis is to determine techniques for using CA to model physical phenomena and to develop the associated mathematics. Results may take the form of simulations and calculations as well as proofs, and applications are suggested throughout. We begin by describing the structure, origins, and modeling categories of CA. A general method for incorporating dissipation in a reversible CA rule is suggested by a model of a lattice gas in the presence of an external potential well. Statistical forces are generated by coupling the gas to a low temperature heat bath. The equilibrium state of the coupled system is analyzed using the principle of maximum entropy. Continuous symmetries are important in eld theory, whereas CA describe discrete elds. However, a novel CA rule for relativistic di usion based on a random walk shows how Lorentz invariance can arise in a lattice model. Simple CA models based on the dynamics of abstract atoms are often capable of capturing the universal behaviors of complex systems. Consequently, parallel lattice Monte Carlo simulations of abstract polymers were devised to respect the steric constraints on polymer dynamics. The resulting double space algorithm is very e cient and correctly captures the static and dynamic scaling behavior characteristic of all polymers. Random numbers are important in stochastic computer simulations; for example, those that use the Metropolis algorithm. A technique for tuning random bits is presented to enable e cient utilization of randomness, especially in CA machines. Interesting areas for future CA research include network simulation, long-range forces, and the dynamics of solids. Basic elements of a calculus for CA are proposed including a discrete representation of one-forms and an analog of integration. Eventually, it may be the case that physi3 cists will be able to formulate cellular automata rules in a manner analogous to how they now derive di erential equations. Thesis Supervisor: Tommaso To oli Title: Principal Research Scientist 4 Acknowledgements The most remarkable thing about MIT is the people one meets here, and it is with great pleasure that I now have the opportunity to thank those who have helped me, directly or indirectly, to complete my graduate studies with a Ph.D. First, I would like to thank my thesis advisor, Tommaso To oli, for taking me as a student and for giving me nancial support and the freedom to work on whatever I wanted. I would also like to thank my thesis committee members Professors Edmund Bertschinger and Felix Villars for the time they spent in meetings and reading my handouts. Professor Villars showed a keen interest in understanding my work by asking questions, suggesting references, arranging contacts with other faculty members, and providing detailed feedback on my writing. I deeply appreciate the personal interest he took in me and my scienti c development. Professor George Koster, who must have the hardest job in the physics department, helped me with numerous administrative matters. The Information Mechanics Group in the Laboratory for Computer Science has been a refuge for me, and its members have been a primary source of strength. Special thanks is due to Norman Margolus who has always been eager to help whenever I had a problem. He and Carol Collura have made me feel at home here by treating me like family. Norm also blazed the thesis trail for me and my fellow graduate students in the group: Joe Hrgovi , Mike Biafore, Milan Shah, David Harnanan, and Raissa cc D'Souza. Being here gave me the opportunity to interact with a parade of visiting scientists: Charles Bennett, G rard Vichniac, Bastien Chopard, Je Yepez, PierLuigi e Pierini, Bob Fisch, Attilia Zumpano, Fred Commoner, Vincenzo D'Andrea, Leonid Khal n, Asher Perez, Andreas Califano, Luca de Alfaro, and Pablo Tamayo. I also had the chance to get to know several bright undergraduate students who worked for the group including Rebecca Frankel, Ruben Agin, Jason Quick, Sasha Wood, Conan Dailey, Jan Maessen, and Debbie Fuchs. Finally, I was able to learn from an eclectic group of engineering sta : Tom Cloney, David Zaig, Tom Durgavich, Ken Streeter, Doug Faust, and Harris Gilliam. My gratitude goes out to the entire group for making my time here interesting and enjoyable as well as educational. I would like to express my appreciation to several members of the support sta : Peggy Berkovitz, Barbara Lobbregt, and Kim Wainwright in physics; Be Hubbard, Joanne Talbot, Anna Pham, David Jones, William Ang, Nick Papadakis, and Scott Blomquist in LCS. Besides generally improving the quality of life, they are the ones who are really responsible for running things and have helped me in countless ways. I am indebted to Professor Yaneer Bar-Yam of Boston University for giving me some exposure to the greater physics community. He was the driving force behind the work on polymers chapter 5 which led to several papers and conference presentations. The collaboration also gave me the opportunity to work with Yitzhak Rabin, a polymer theorist from Israel, as well as with Boris Ostrovsky and others in the polymer center at Boston University. Yaneer has also shown me uncommon strength and kindness which I can only hope to pick up. My rst years at MIT were ones of great academic isolation, and I would have dropped out long ago if it were not for the fellowship of friends that I got to know at the Thursday night co ee hour in Ashdown House|it was an hour that would often 5 go on for many. The original gang from my rst term included Eugene Gath, John Baez, Monty McGovern, Bob Holt, Brian Oki, Robin Vaughan, Glen Kissel, Richard Sproat, and Dan Heinzen. Later years included David Stanley, Arnout Eikeboom, Rich Koch, Vipul Bhushan, Erik Meyer, and most recently, Nate Osgood and Lily Lee from outside Ashdown. I thank you for the intellectual sustenance and fond memories you have given me. Co ee hour was initiated by housemasters Bob and Carol Hulsizer, and I have probably logged 2000 hours in the dining room that now bears their name. Many thanks to them and the new housemasters, Beth and Vernon Ingram, for holding this and other social activities which have made Ashdown House such an enjoyable place to live. Finally, I owe my deepest gratitude to my family for their continual love, support, and encouragement. I dedicate this thesis to them. Support was provided in part by the National Science Foundation, grant no. 8618002-IRI, in part by DARPA, grant no. N00014-89-J-1988, and in part by ARPA, grant no. N00014-93-1-0660. 6 To Mom, Dad, Sarah, David, and Pamela 7 8 Contents 1 Cellular Automata Methods in Mathematical Physics 2 Cellular Automata as Models of Nature 2.1 The Structure of Cellular Automata : 2.2 A Brief History of Cellular Automata 2.3 A Taxonomy of Cellular Automata : 2.3.1 Chaotic Rules : : : : : : : : : 2.3.2 Voting Rules : : : : : : : : : 2.3.3 Reversible Rules : : : : : : : 2.3.4 Lattice Gases : : : : : : : : : 2.3.5 Material Transport : : : : : : 2.3.6 Excitable Media : : : : : : : : 2.3.7 Conventional Computation : : 15 : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 19 19 24 26 27 29 33 35 38 40 43 47 47 48 50 51 51 56 60 3 Reversibility, Dissipation, and Statistical Forces 3.1 Introduction : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 3.1.1 Reversibility and the Second Law of Thermodynamics : 3.1.2 Potential Energy and Statistical Forces : : : : : : : : : 3.1.3 Overview : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 3.2 A CA Model of Potentials and Forces : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 3.2.1 Description of the Model : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 3.2.2 Basic Statistical Analysis : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 3.2.3 A Numerical Example : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 9 47 3.3 CAM-6 Implementation of the Model : : : 3.3.1 CAM-6 Architecture : : : : : : : : 3.3.2 Description of the Rule : : : : : : : 3.3.3 Generalization of the Rule : : : : : 3.4 The Maximum Entropy State : : : : : : : 3.4.1 Broken Ergodicity : : : : : : : : : : 3.4.2 Finite Size E ects : : : : : : : : : : 3.4.3 Revised Statistical Analysis : : : : 3.5 Results of Simulation : : : : : : : : : : : : 3.6 Applications and Extensions : : : : : : : : 3.6.1 Microelectronic Devices : : : : : : 3.6.2 Self-organization : : : : : : : : : : 3.6.3 Heat Baths and Random Numbers 3.6.4 Discussion : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 3.7 Conclusions : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 61 62 65 69 71 72 75 76 79 81 81 82 85 86 88 91 91 92 94 98 98 99 103 106 4 Lorentz Invariance in Cellular Automata 4.1 Introduction : : : : : : : : : : : : : 4.1.1 Relativity and Physical Law 4.1.2 Overview : : : : : : : : : : 4.2 A Model of Relativistic Di usion : 4.3 Theory and Experiment : : : : : : 4.3.1 Analytic Solution : : : : : : 4.3.2 CAM Simulation : : : : : : 4.4 Extensions and Discussion : : : : : 4.5 Conclusions : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 91 5 Modeling Polymers with Cellular Automata 5.1 Introduction : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 109 5.1.1 Atoms, the Behavior of Matter, and Cellular Automata : : : : 109 5.1.2 Monte Carlo Methods, Polymer Physics, and Scaling : : : : : 111 10 109 5.2 5.3 5.4 5.5 6.1 6.2 6.3 6.4 5.1.3 Overview : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : CA Models of Abstract Polymers : : : : : : : : : : : : 5.2.1 General Algorithms : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 5.2.2 The Double Space Algorithm : : : : : : : : : : 5.2.3 Comparison with the Bond Fluctuation Method Results of Test Simulations : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : Applications : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 5.4.1 Polymer Melts, Solutions, and Gels : : : : : : : 5.4.2 Pulsed Field Gel Electrophoresis : : : : : : : : : Conclusions : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : Introduction : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : Network Modeling : : : : : : : : : : : The Problem of Forces and Gravitation The Dynamics of Solids : : : : : : : : : 6.4.1 Statement of the Problem : : : 6.4.2 Discussion : : : : : : : : : : : : 6.4.3 Implications and Applications : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 112 113 115 118 122 124 130 131 134 138 141 141 145 148 149 150 152 6 Future Prospects for Physical Modeling with Cellular Automata 141 : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 7 Conclusions A A Microcanocial Heat Bath A.1 Probabilities and Statistics : : : : : : : : A.1.1 Derivation of Probabilities : : : : A.1.2 Alternate Derivation : : : : : : : A.2 Measuring and Setting the Temperature A.3 Additional Thermodynamics : : : : : : : 155 : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 157 157 158 160 162 164 B Broken Ergodicity and Finite Size E ects B.1 Fluctuations and Initial Conserved Currents : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 167 B.2 Corrections to the Entropy : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 169 11 167 B.3 Statistics of the Coupled System : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 172 C Canonical Stochastic Weights C.1 Overview : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : C.2 Functions of Boolean Random Variables C.2.1 The Case of Arbitrary Weights : C.2.2 The Canonical Weights : : : : : : C.2.3 Proof of Uniqueness : : : : : : : C.3 Application in CAM-8 : : : : : : : : : : C.4 Discussion and Extensions : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 175 175 176 177 178 182 183 184 D Di erential Analysis of a Relativistic Di usion Law D.1 Elementary Di erential Geometry, Notation, and Conventions : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : D.1.1 Scalar, Vector, and Tensor Fields : : D.1.2 Metric Geometry : : : : : : : : : : : D.1.3 Minkowski Space : : : : : : : : : : : D.2 Conformal Invariance : : : : : : : : : : : : : D.2.1 Conformal Transformations : : : : : D.2.2 The Conformal Group : : : : : : : : D.3 Analytic Solution : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 191 : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 192 192 198 200 203 203 206 209 : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : E Basic Polymer Scaling Laws E.1 Radius of Gyration : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 216 E.2 Rouse Relaxation Time : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 219 F.1 Cellular Automata Representations of Physical Fields F.2 Scalars and One-Forms : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : F.3 Integration : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : F.3.1 Area : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : F.3.2 Winding Number : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 12 215 F Di erential Forms for Cellular Automata : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 221 221 222 224 225 225 F.3.3 Perimeter : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 228 Bibliography 233 13 14 Chapter 1 Cellular Automata Methods in Mathematical Physics The objective of this thesis is to explore and develop the potential of cellular automata as mathematical tools for physical modeling. Cellular automata CA have a number of features that make them attractive for simulating and studying physical processes. In addition to having computational advantages, they also o er a precise framework for mathematical analysis. The development proceeds by constructing and then analyzing CA models that resemble a particular physical situation or that illustrate some physical principle. This in turn leads to a variety of subjects of interest for mathematical physics. The paragraphs below serve as a preview of the major points of this work. The term cellular automata refers to an intrinsically parallel model of computation that consists of a regular latticework of identical processors that compute in lockstep while exchanging information with nearby processors. Chapter 2 discusses CA in more detail, gives some examples, and reviews some of the ways they have been used. Cellular automata started as mathematical constructs which were not necessarily intended to run on actual computers. However, CA can be e ciently implemented as computer hardware in the form of cellular automata machines, and these machines have sparked a renewed interest in CA as modeling tools. Unfortunately, much of the resulting development in this direction has been limited to demos" of potential 15 application areas, and many of the resulting models have been left wanting supporting analysis. This thesis is an e ort to improve the situation by putting the eld on a more methodical, mathematical tack. A problem that comes up in many contexts when designing CA rules for physical modeling is the question of how to introduce forces among the constituent parts of a system under consideration. This problem is exacerbated if one wants to obtain an added measure of faithfulness to real physical laws by making the dynamics reversible. The model presented in chapter 3 gives a technique for generating statistical forces which are derived from an external potential energy function. In the process, it clari es the how and why of dissipation in the face of microscopic reversibility. The chapter also serves as a paradigm for modeling in statistical mechanics and thermodynamics using cellular automata machines and shows how one has control over all aspects of a problem|from conception and implementation, through theory and experiment, to application and generalization. Finally, the compact representation of the potential energy function that is used gives one way to represent a physical eld and brings up the general problem of representing arbitrary elds. Many eld theories are characterized by symmetries under one or more Lie groups, and it is a problem to reconcile the continuum with the discrete nature of CA. At the nest level, a CA cannot re ect the continuous symmetries of a conventional physical law because of the digital degrees of freedom and the inhomogeneous, anisotropic nature of a lattice. Therefore, the desired symmetry must either arise as a suitable limit of a simple process or emerge as a collective behavior of an underlying complex dynamics. The maximum speed of propagation of information in CA suggests a connection with relativity, and chapter 4 shows how a CA model of di usion can display Lorentz invariance despite having a preferred frame of reference. Kinetic theory can be used to derive the properties of lattice gases, and a basic Boltzmann transport argument leads to a manifestly covariant di erential equation for the limiting continuum case. The exact solution of this di erential equation compares favorably with a CA simulation, and other interesting mathematical properties can be derived as well. One of the most important areas of application of high-performance computation 16 is that of molecular dynamics, and p...
View Full Document

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern