Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl

Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl -...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–7. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Click to edit Master subtitle style  2/8/11 Intro to American literature (350:227) November 3, 2010 Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl:  Literature or Social History?
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
 2/8/11 Reading Quiz 1. The narrator asks, “Reader, did you ever hate? I hope not.  I never did but once…”   What prompts this feeling? 2. What is the narrator referring to when she confesses, “The remembrance fills me with  sorrow and shame.  It pains me to tell you of it”? 3. How does the narrator elude her captors before she escapes to the North? 4. Fill in the blank: “Yet the retrospection is not altogether without solace; for with those  gloomy recollections come tender memories of ________, like light fleecy clouds floating  over a dark and troubled sea.”  
Background image of page 2
 2/8/11 Definitions Social history  is the study of minor events in history (rather than the  major political or military events). More important, it studies the  activities, attitudes, and behaviors of everyday people rather than the  “major players” in history. From Penguin’s  Dictionary of Literary Terms : “Literature:  A vague term  which usually denotes works which belong to the major genres: epic,  drama, lyric, novel, short story, ode.  If we describe something as  ‘literature’, as opposed to anything else, the term carries with it  qualitative connotations which imply that the work in question has  superior qualities; that it is well above the ordinary run of written  works.”
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
 2/8/11 Better definitions Instead, the works should be defined by how  we as  readers  receive them: If we read a work as  social history , we read through that work  to a picture of life as it was lived by a particular group at a  particular moment in history. e.g.,  Incidents  paints a vivid picture of the lived experience of a  female slave, demonstrating how all slaves (particularly female  slaves) struggled to maintain their dignity and eventually to win  their freedom. If we read a work as  literature , we pay more attention to how  the work is written and engage in the practice of  close reading .
Background image of page 4
 2/8/11 Incidents  as Social History
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
 2/8/11 Incidents  as Social History p. 1815: “Again and again I revolved in my mind how  all this would end.  There was no hope that the  doctor would consent to sell me on any terms.  He  had an iron will, and was determined to keep me,  and to conquer me.  My lover was an intelligent and 
Background image of page 6
Image of page 7
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 20

Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl -...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 7. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online