rowlandson.slides

rowlandson.slides - Cemetery English Wigwam, modern...

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Mary Rowlandson, The Sovereignty and Goodness of  God Early American Literature Professor Iannini September 19, 2010
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Quiz 1.Describe one unusual thing that Rowlandson eats during her captivity, and how she feels about eating it. 1.Describe another. 1.Describe Rowlandson’s actions and state of mind after the death of her daughter.
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Frontispiece of Mary Rowlandson's Captivity Narrative, 1770 Edition
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Increase Mather on “King Phillip’s War” : 1. The devastation inflicted by the Indians demonstrated God’s anger with the colonists. 2. God was angry with the colonists for abandoning the spiritual rigor and piety of New England’s founding generation and lapsing into the pursuit of personal, material and sensual pleasure. 3. Only a thorough spiritual reformation in which the colonists begged God for forgiveness and changed their ways would lift the threat of Indian attacks.
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Rebecca Nurse Farm, Danvers, Massacusetts. c. 1678
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Thomas Paine (d 1721)Truro Old North
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Unformatted text preview: Cemetery English Wigwam, modern reconstruction English Wigwam, modern reconstruction Conclusions : 1. Rowlandsons unresolved grief over the death of her daughter leads her to represent her captivity in ways that sometime contradict Mathers ideological and theological designs. Rowlandson in some sense refuses the command to move forward from individual grief to a more resigned acceptance of the death of a loved one as Gods just retribution for the sins of the captive and her community. 2. This is reflected both in the longing for communal mourning throughout the text and in her lingering sense of alienation from the Puritan community after being redeemed from captivity. 3. As Rowlandson moves outside cultural ideology, she begins to represent her Algonquian captors in more complicated ways, providing detailed portraits of of cultural practice....
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rowlandson.slides - Cemetery English Wigwam, modern...

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