stowe.slides - Harriet Beecher Stowe Uncle Toms Cabin...

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Click to edit Master subtitle style 2/8/11 Harriet Beecher Stowe Uncle Tom’s Cabin Introduction to American Literature I Professor Iannini
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2/8/11 ALLEGORY 1. Like Hawthorne, Stowe draws on a long and influential tradition of Puritan allegory. 2. But Hawthorne uses allegory to dramatize its failure, leaving us in a state of moral perplexity and psychological confusion. 3. Stowe uses allegory to transform the emotional and spiritual experience of her readers in a different way. 4. She wants to instill a vivid and painful sense of the national sin of slavery, in the hopes that it will lead to voluntary emancipation of slaves.
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2/8/11 Good characters, like Tom and Evangeline St. Clair, are versions of Christ. Free places, like “the North,” are versions of the biblical “Canaan” (Typology!)
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2/8/11 STOWE’S ALLEGORY DRAWS ON THE MOST CENTRAL MYTHS AND FAMILIAR ASSUMPTIONS OF HER CULTURE TO CULTIVATE THE BROADEST AUDIENCE POSSIBLE: 1. Racial Stereotypes
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This note was uploaded on 02/07/2011 for the course ENGLISH 227 taught by Professor Iannini during the Spring '11 term at Rutgers.

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stowe.slides - Harriet Beecher Stowe Uncle Toms Cabin...

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