152X%20-%20World%20War%20II%20Homefront%20and%20Early%20Cold%20War

152X%20-%20World%20War%20II%20Homefront%20and%20Early%20Cold%20War

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–5. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: World War II on the Homefront Building a Citizen Army: 1940: FDR encouraged Congress to pass the Selective Service Act in the event of war. 16 million Americans served in the war, most between the ages of 18 and 26. Almost everyone had a family member in the military. 2/3 of American military men were drafted. 350,000 women served in the Nurses Corps and womens military units. Conversion to a War Economy: 1940: America remained mired in the Great Depression 1 in 7 still without a job. Factories converted from making passenger cars to assembling tanks and airplanes production ramped up to record levels. Federal budget went from 10 to 100 billion. Creation of the War Production Board headed by the Government. Set production priorities and pushed for maximum output. Union workers pledged not to strike. U.S. became the arsenal of democracy supplying the U.S. and the Allies with military goods. Women and World War II: Millions of American women left home toting a lunch pail and changed into overalls and work gloves to work on assembly lines. Before the war, 25% of American women worked outside of the home, most as teachers, nurses, social workers, or domestic servants. Few women worked in the factories. Government ads urged women to take industrial jobs, to take their place on the Victory Line. By 1945, 18 million women worked outside of the home, a 50% increase from 1939. Women earned an average of $31 a week, men received $54. Women who stayed at home grew Victory Gardens, saved tin cans and newspaper for recycling, and purchased war bonds. Buying a washing machine or a new car out of the question. Items rationed: tires, gasoline, shoes, and meat. African Americans and the War: Between 1915 and 1920, half a million blacks had left the rural South for industrial jobs in Northern cities: Chicago, Cleveland, Detroit, Gary, etc. Once the war ended, many blacks lost their jobs. Blacks served in the military during World War I but faced widespread racial discrimination Separate officer training school for blacks in Iowa. Only forces to serve under foreign (French) command during WWI were black. USO shows bypassed blacks. Troops segregated. Some black leaders questioned military service Why should blacks fight and die for America without equal rights at home?...
View Full Document

Page1 / 26

152X%20-%20World%20War%20II%20Homefront%20and%20Early%20Cold%20War

This preview shows document pages 1 - 5. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online