Lecture10_EAS1600_Fall08-1

Lecture10_EAS1600_Fall08-1 - EAS 1600 Introduction to...

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Unformatted text preview: EAS 1600 Introduction to Environmental Sciences Lecture 10 The Ideal Gas Law, Pressure, Density, and Buoyancy First we will talk about the ideal gas law and the dependence of gas density on temperature and pressure. Second we will begin our discussion of vertical an horizontal motions of gas in the atmosphere. An ideal gas is -- a gas that obeys the ideal gas law which is a mathematical relationship that governs the gas so-called state variables: Temperature Pressure Density Temperature As we have discussed before temperature is a measure of the amount of internal energy (or heat) a substance contains. The energy is indicated by the random movement of the molecules that make up the substance. The more energy contained in a substance, the greater the velocity of the molecules, and in turn the greater the temperature. Temperature is a macroscopic measure of the average kinetic energy contained in the molecules of a gas {Avg KE} = m v avg 2 = k B T Where v avg = average random molecular velocity k B = Boltzmanns constant = 1.38 x 10-23 J/(K molecule) m = mass of a molecule of the substance = M m /N A M m = molecular mass (kilograms/mole) N A = Avogadros Number =6.02 x 10 23 molecules/mole Random Thermal Velocity: Example...
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Lecture10_EAS1600_Fall08-1 - EAS 1600 Introduction to...

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