Lab+8+-+Climate - EAS 1601 Lab 8: Climate Sample Prelab...

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EAS 1601 Lab 8: “Climate” Sample Prelab Quiz (note: actual quiz may differ) 1. Describe the most important properties of the greenhouse gases 2. What does it mean, if a planet has albedo that is close to 1 ? 3. What does it mean, if a planet has albedo that approaches 0 ? 4. Name three most important greenhouse gases on Earth: _________________ __________________ __________________ 1
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EAS 1601 Lab 8: “Climate” SYNOPSIS: In this lab we use the EARTH/VENUS/MARS module of the Solar System Collaboratory developed by University of Colorado. Using these simulations, we explore the factors that control the temperature of a planet and, hence, the possibilities for the existence of life. Part 1. Distance and albedo Open the University of Colorado Solar System Collaboratory website on your computer. To do so: Launch your internet browser (be sure that the window is not maximized). Now go to http://solarsystem.colorado.edu . Note, that pop-ups should be allowed to work with this site (allow pop-ups by clicking on the yellow bar just below the address line on the top of the screen) Click on "Enter Website - Low Resolution (1024x768)", click on the “ Modules option, and finally, select the “ The greenhouse effect: Earth/Venus/Mars module. In one of the previous labs we considered the effects the distance of a planet from the Sun and the planet’s albedo have on temperature. In this lab we will explore the effect an atmosphere has on the temperature of a planet. We will start with a very simple model (no atmosphere) and build up the level of complexity. Go to the “ Planet Temperature ” applet. Note: Please be careful while adjusting the parameters of the model: press ENTER every time after changing albedo, greenhouse effect strength, etc. 1.1 For the “ Fast rotating, dark planet ” model, obtain the model temperatures for the Earth/Venus/Mars. To do this, use the mouse to adjust the “Planet X” orbit until it coincides with Earth/Venus/Mars orbit. Record the temperatures in the Table 1 (below). 1.2 Now switch to the “ Fast rotating planet with adjustable albedo ” model. Using the appropriate values of planets’ albedo, observe the temperatures predicted for Earth/Venus/Mars. Record the temperatures in the Table 1. 1.3 Now look at the actual (observed) temperatures of the Earth/Venus/Mars (look in the FACT SHEET or search the Internet). Record the average observed temperatures in the Table 1. Questions: Question 1. Which planet has the best agreement between actual temperatures and predicted by the Fast rotating planet with adjustable albedo ” model temperatures? (2 pts). Question 2. Which planet has the worst agreement? (2 pts) 2
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Part 2. Greenhouse Gases Think of the planets as hikers who try to keep warm at night. The first thing they do is build a fire and huddle around it. The closer you are to the fire, the warmer you are. Like the hikers, the planets huddle around the central fire in the Solar system. We saw last time that the closer a planet
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This note was uploaded on 02/08/2011 for the course EAS 1601 taught by Professor Lynch during the Spring '08 term at Georgia Institute of Technology.

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Lab+8+-+Climate - EAS 1601 Lab 8: Climate Sample Prelab...

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