Lab+09+Reservoirs

Lab+09+Reservoirs - EAS 1601 Lab 10 Introduction to...

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EAS 1601 Lab 10 Introduction to Reservoirs and Global Cycles: The Water Cycle” Sample Prelab Quiz (note: actual quiz may differ) 1. Why water moves in the water cycle? 2. Is there more or less water on Earth now than 5,000 years ago? 3. Name 3 major water reservoirs. a) b) c) 4. Name 3 fluxes of water in the Earth water cycle. a) b) c) 1
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EAS 1601 Lab 10 Introduction to Reservoirs and Global Cycles: The Water Cycle” Name__________________________ Section________________ The abundance of water on the Earth is one of the most striking differences that make it a unique planet in the solar system. It is generally accepted that abundant water is necessary for a planet to be habitable. Water on the earth is “cycled” through various reservoirs largely due to a “solar engine”, that is, solar energy drives the evaporation of water from the Earth’s surface, which then condenses in the atmosphere due mainly to cooling. Water then falls back to Earth as precipitation and is compartmentalized into the various reservoirs. The movement of water into or out of one reservoir to another is called a flux. These processes are summarized generally and schematically in Figure 1 . Figure 1 : Schematic Representation of the Water Cycle. This representation assumes no net loss of water to outer space. Flux units are in 10 3 km 3 yr -1 . 2
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Name________________________________ Section ___________ Part 1. Compartmentalization of reservoirs. Below is a table showing estimated volumes of water in various storage compartments (reservoirs). Complete the table (fill the empty spaces) and answer the questions below. Table 1. [ 8 pts ] Storage Compartment (Reservoir) Volume ( × 10 3 km 3 ) Percent of total Fresh Water Lakes 125 _________ Saline Lakes 104 _________ Rivers 1.25 _________ Groundwater 8417 _________ Water in Land Areas: Ice Caps/ Glaciers 29200 _________ Atmosphere 13 ___________ Oceans 1320000 ____________ Total __________ 100% Question 1 . [ 2 pts ] Examine Figure 1. Look at the values of water fluxes for the precipitation and the evaporation considering the whole Earth surface. What can be said about these fluxes? Question 2 . [ 4 pts ] Consider the processes/fluxes of (1) evaporation, (2) precipitation, (3) groundwater flow, and (4) surface runoff over the entire Earth’s surface. Write an equation that would express the runoff in terms of: a) Precipitation and evaporation fluxes. b) Groundwater flow and surface runoff 3
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Question 3. Consider the water flux values given in Figure 1 for precipitation and evaporation over the sea. What can we say about precipitation versus evaporation over the sea? (2 pts) Question 4. Consider the water flux values given in Figure 1 for precipitation and evaporation over the land masses. What can we say about precipitation versus evaporation over land? (2 pts) Question 5. Which reservoir (from Table 1) has the greatest amount of water in storage? (2 pts) Question 6. Which reservoir (out of “Water in Land Areas” in Table 1) has the greatest
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This note was uploaded on 02/08/2011 for the course EAS 1601 taught by Professor Lynch during the Spring '08 term at Georgia Tech.

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Lab+09+Reservoirs - EAS 1601 Lab 10 Introduction to...

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