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IEEE+Spectrum+March+2007+-+RFID+Inside

IEEE+Spectrum+March+2007+-+RFID+Inside - bIoMEdIcAl RFID...

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24 IEEE Spectrum | March 2007 | NA www.spectrum.ieee.org RFID The murky ethics of implanted chips by Kenneth R. FosteR & Jan JaegeR bIoMEdIcAl Authorized licensed use limited to: Georgia Institute of Technology. Downloaded on August 2, 2009 at 21:16 from IEEE Xplore. Restrictions apply.
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guSto IMAgES Authorized licensed use limited to: Georgia Institute of Technology. Downloaded on August 2, 2009 at 21:16 from IEEE Xplore. Restrictions apply.
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anatomy of an RFID tag sIZe the device is 11 millimeters long and about 1 mm in diameter, comparable to a grain of rice. the Verichip implantable RFId tag, shown below, is the only tag approved for use in humans for a medical application. It is a simple device consisting of a coil of wire and a hermeti- cally sealed microchip within a glass capsule. the coil acts as an antenna and uses an RFId reader’s varying magnetic field to power the microchip and transmit a radio signal. Each Verichip’s signal is a unique identifying number that links to a medical record database. tIssUe-bonDIng CaP A cap made from a special plastic covers a hermetically sealed glass capsule containing the RFId circuitry. the plastic is designed to bond with human tissue and prevent the capsule from moving around once it has been implanted. antenna the coils of the antenna turn the reader’s varying magnetic field into current to power the chip. the coil is coupled to a capacitor to form a circuit that resonates at 134 kilohertz. lEStERlEFkowItz (2) ID ChIP the chip modulates the amplitude of the current going through the antenna to continuously repeat a 128-bit signal. the bits are represented by a change in amplitude—low to high or high to low. An analysis by Jonathan westhues, of cambridge, Mass., indicated that only 32 of the bits varied between any two Verichips. the rest of the bits probably tell the reader when the loop starts and may also contain some error-checking or correction data. Authorized licensed use limited to: Georgia Institute of Technology. Downloaded on August 2, 2009 at 21:16 from IEEE Xplore. Restrictions apply.
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www.spectrum.ieee.org March 2007 | IEEE Spectrum | NA 27 With the proliferation of radio-frequency identification tech- nology and the recent, but increasing, use of implantable RFID chips in humans, we may already be on a path that would make such an ad commonplace in a 2017 issue of IEEE Spectrum . The benefits would be undeniable—an implantable RFID chip, which is durable and about the size of a grain of rice, can hold or link to information about the identity, physiological character- istics, health, nationality, and security clearances of the person it’s embedded in. The proximity of your hand could start your car or unlock your front door or let an emergency room physi- cian know you are a diabetic even if you are unconscious. Once implanted, the chip and the information it contains are always with you—you’d never lose your keys again.
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