Wired+072009+-+Adaptive+Cruise+Control+Goes+Mainstream

Wired+072009+-+Adaptive+Cruise+Control+Goes+Mainstream -...

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Unformatted text preview: << By gregory mone PLAY PREVIOUS: What to Expect from Will Wright's Stupid Fun Club NEXT: Swank Up Your Facebook Page With a Hand-Painted Portrait Back to Article WIRED MAGAZINE: 17.08 07.20.09 2010 Ford Taurus Photo: Brian Finke Heading south on the New Jersey Turnpike, Ford Motor Company engineer Jerry Engelman swings his 2010 Taurus into the left lane to pass a semi. The Taurus hesitates, slowing down, and then Engelman adjusts his heading. The car takes off. "Larry," he calls to his colleague in the back seat, "write that down!" Engelman is driving, but just barely. The Taurus has a radar-based adaptive cruise-control system that lets him set a top speed and then simply steer while the car adjusts its velocity according to traffic. He's been weaving and changing lanes, doing between 45 and 70 mphand hasn't touched a pedal in an hour. Over the past few years, Ford engineers have driven 60,000 miles to test, tweak, and optimize this system, which also provides collision warning alerts. They've been focused on60,000 miles to test, tweak, and optimize this system, which also provides collision warning alerts....
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