Lecture Notes - CourseOutline...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Course Outline 19/05/2008 12:07:00 Third test isn’t cumulative, first and second are. Contact Information: Jon Bokser – 908 268 5357 Jennifer Kruel - 908 328 5780 Amanda Renda  908 892 7609 Professor: Dan Aronson H320A ext. 8238 Textbook: Schiller, B. The Macro Economy Today First test is Week’s 1-4 on chapter’s: 1, 3, 5, 7, 8. Second test is Week’s 5-9 on chapter’s: 8, 9, 10 (and some of the first test). Third test is Week’s 10-14 on chapter’s: 12, 13, 15. Assignment Dictation Importantist
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Macroeconomics 19/05/2008 12:07:00 Macroeconomics vs. Microeconomics: Macro concerns more global topics,  John Maynard Keynes – “Most influential economist” of the past century. Has been writing since the 1930’s. Today unemployment is about 5% Why we need to stop Economic Growth? Economic Growth: Increase in goods and services. Almost all policy makers try to accelerate economic growth.  But they dispute  amongst each other in the strategies. As businesses grow, supply goes up and they need to hire more employees  so this brings unemployment down. As we build more we occupy more space Too much development leads to more traffic More production can be a decrease in the standard of living if transportation is  worse We could use alternate forms of energy, which might take a big upfront at  first, but would pay off in the end, renewable. (NJ has faster growing solar energy) due to suburban sprawl the effectiveness of public transportation in the  suburbs has gone down. Through efficiencies and technologies we can produce less and get more <-  Main Point ---------- Starting Textbook Notes -----------
Background image of page 2
Economists starts by assuming that people always want more goods and  services.  At any point and time resources are limited.  This causes a shortage.  If we’re  making full use of our resources, then an increase in the production of one good  requires a decrease in the production of another.  Scarcity is the core problem. Economics revolves around tradeoffs.  Getting more of one thing means getting  less of another, but that’s not  always  the case.  What if we’re not “making full use of our  resources”?  We’re currently not making full use of our resources.  So in order to  produce more we just need to employ the unemployed. Making full use of resources = Full Employment (WW2, mid to late 60’s, etc…)
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 20

Lecture Notes - CourseOutline...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online