Feeding%20%26%20Nutrition%202010

Feeding%20%26%20Nutrition%202010 - Click to edit Master...

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Unformatted text preview: Click to edit Master subtitle style ANSC 102 Animal Nutrition Animal Nutrition (terms) Nutrient = is a food constituent that aids in the support of life. Nonruminant (monogastric) An animal without a functional rumen, which is sometimes called a monogastric, swine poultry and young calves. An animal with a functional rumen. Nutrition Nutrient is a food constituent that aids in the support of life There are six classes of nutrients:- Carbohydrates- Fats- Proteins- Minerals- Vitamins- Water Use of Nutrients Nutrition All animals need to receive a balanced ration Maintenance ration usually during a non- productive portion of life. Reproductive/Lactation/ growth - exceeds normal maintenance requirements and formulated to meet the needs of the growing fetus or milk or egg production needs. Growth of Fetus Nutrition Carbohydrates a) Main source of energy in most livestock & poultry rations (~ 60-70 %) b) organic (carbon, hydrogen, oxygen, CHO) Energy supplied by carbohydrates can be used for: a) Maintenance b) Growth c) Reproduction d) Production (milk and eggs) e) Work f) Building blocks for the use of other nutrients Nutrition (Different Classes) 1. Monosaccharide (Glucose) 2. Disaccharide (Sucrose [table sugar], lactose, maltose) 3. Polysaccharide- starch- cellulose (good for ruminants)- hemicellulose (pentoses (5C) and hexoses (6C)- glycogen (storage form of glucose in the liver) Lignin (indigestible by both ruminants and nonruminants) Glucose (Structure) http://www2.nl.edu/jste/carbohyd.htm Alpha linkages are common in both starch and glycogen (sugar molecules found in the body) and are highly available. Beta linkages are very common in cellulose products and the sugar is only available to those organisms which are specially adapted to breaking it down (cow and termite). Starch Maltose unit Amylose and Hemicellulose (arabino-xylan) Xylose backbone Arabinose side chains Cytoplasm...
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This note was uploaded on 02/07/2011 for the course ANSC 102 taught by Professor Staff during the Fall '08 term at Purdue University-West Lafayette.

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Feeding%20%26%20Nutrition%202010 - Click to edit Master...

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