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psychpaper3 - Psychology 100 Paper 3 Theory of Arguments...

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Psychology 100 Paper # 3: Theory of Arguments Julie Gilbert 12-4-07 Dr. Murnane
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In Experiment 1, the independent variables are the one and two-sided arguments against Hillary Clinton, because these are factors that will be manipulated by the subject to produce a response. The subject’s response is the dependant variable. The subject’s response includes the percentages that indicate how likely the subjects were to agree with each respective argument. The prediction of this experiment is that both of the arguments will have an effect on which candidate the subject will ultimately vote for. It is predicted that the two-sided argument presented against the presidential candidate Hillary Clinton will have a greater effect on the subject’s desire to vote for her than the one-sided argument. This prediction was verified by the results of the experiment. 55% of the subjects said they would not vote for Clinton after hearing the two-sided argument, and only 36% of the subjects said they would not vote for Clinton after hearing the one-sided argument. Almost 20% more of the subject’s opinions were affected by the two-sided argument, proving the initial theory correct. People’s beliefs are more likely to be changed by a fair and equitable two-
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psychpaper3 - Psychology 100 Paper 3 Theory of Arguments...

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