hist250rr10

hist250rr10 - Julie Gilbert HIST250, Sec 0101 Reading...

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Julie Gilbert HIST250, Sec 0101 Reading Response 10 November 10, 2008 After Iberian hegemony had been exerted for so long in Latin America, the indigenous attitudes under the hegemonic rule began to change. Native peoples began to rebel; an example of this is the riot of 1692. This act of rebellion challenged the authoritative figure of the Spanish presence. The Spanish, in order to maintain hegemonic control, had to “unsheath the sword of vengeance over [the natives] to contain the unrestrained boldness of [them]” (126). A way of asserting and maintaining control was to twist accounts in their favor, ignoring problems like food shortages when giving reason for Indian rebellion and placing blame on the Indians and removing blame from themselves. According to the Spaniards in regards to the maize shortage, “why should [they] be blamed for an act of G-d, quite possibly brought on by the Indians on wickedness?” (132). By absolving themselves of any blame, they were able to justify
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This note was uploaded on 02/08/2011 for the course HIST 240 taught by Professor Lampe during the Spring '08 term at Maryland.

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hist250rr10 - Julie Gilbert HIST250, Sec 0101 Reading...

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