hist250rr11

hist250rr11 - Julie Gilbert HIST250, Sec 0101 Reading...

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Julie Gilbert HIST250, Sec 0101 Reading Response 11 November 17, 2008 Racial hierarchy in Latin America became more complicated as the region began to develop and diversify. As Cope states, “race is not self-evident” (Cope 49), and social position based on race became more difficult to determine. Since race is socially constructed, “such distinctions…merely divide a society into dominant or subordinate groups” (Cope, 50). The criterion people sometimes tended to use to make identifications were based on appearance. However, this proved to be difficult, as physical characteristics of Spanish and mesitzos were more similar to those of Spanish and blacks, and harder to determine. Because of this, it was necessary to have “several criteria for racial identification…some of which could overrule appearance” (Cope, 53). For example, examining names, gave insight into a person’s racial heritage. Because plebeians only had first names, it was harder to trace their lineage. There were parish
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hist250rr11 - Julie Gilbert HIST250, Sec 0101 Reading...

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