Ch 5 Lexical entries

Ch 5 Lexical entries - LexicalEntries...

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Click to edit Master subtitle style Chapter five Lexical Entries
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Why PS rules need to be constrained Semantically ill-formed sentences:  #The hammer on the rabbit saw a cage slowly. #The popsicle ate the shelf on the judge. Ungrammatical sentences:  *A rabbit scolded. *The squid went the fish. 
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The Lexicon  The lexicon is a “mental dictionary” Every lexical entry includes information about:  Phonological shape: /dræg n/ ə Meaning: ‘a mythical monster’ Syntactic category:  N  Other grammatical information: [+count] Irregular forms, other information   Subcategories Binary [+ or -] Count, irregular, auxiliary, etc…
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Argument structure The argument structure of a predicate is a  requires.  Predicates take different arguments (number and  type) see <experiencer, stimulus> put <agent, theme, goal>  congratulate <agent, patient> 
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Subcategorization Each argument is associated with a particular  grammatical role:        saw  the movie  Experiencer stimulus  SUBJ OBJ  We can express this through subcategorization:  see <agent, stimulus>                SUBJ        OBJ Give<agent, theme, recipient>                 SUBJ  OBJ      OBL
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Transitivity An  intransitive  verb does not take an object.  The rabbit hopped.   transitive  verb takes an object:  King Kong captured the young woman.   ditransitive  verb takes two objects:  Tony gave Mary a diamond bracelet.  
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Syntactic Valence Syntactic valence is related to transitivity:  How  many terms ( direct arguments/terms)  does a verb  take?   Valence = # of objects + 1 Yawn = 1; slap = 2;  What about give?   I gave you the money.  (3)  I gave the money to you.  (2)  What about put?   I put the money on the table.  (2) 
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Ch 5 Lexical entries - LexicalEntries...

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