Ch1pp - Chapter 1 Chapter 1 Thinking about Guidance and...

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Unformatted text preview: Chapter 1 Chapter 1 Thinking about Guidance and Discipline Fields, Perry & Fields (2010) Guidance & Discipline Guidance & Discipline • • • Complex, confusing and frustrating Effective discipline is multifacated Requires a sophisticated set of understandings and skills Discipline Defined Discipline Defined Guidance – helping kids deal with problems Disciple – to lead, to teach Discipline – helping children to learn personal responsibility for their behavior and to judge between right and wrong for themselves. • Emphasis on teaching rather than stopping unproductive actions • Teach children what to do instead of just stopping undesirable behaviors • • • Discipline Discipline • This includes helping children understand why certain behaviors are better than others • Teaching children to act in a desirable manner • Support children to become responsible, kind and productive • Key element – determine the cause of undesirable behaviors and work to eliminate that cause. Discipline Discipline • This includes helping children understand why certain behaviors are better than others • Teaching children to act in a desirable manner • Support children to become responsible, kind and productive • Key element – determine the cause of undesirable behaviors and work to eliminate that cause. • Teach skills, rather than punish missing skills Discipline Goals Discipline Goals • Identify long term goals – what kinds of people function best in society? • Self­concept – an understanding of who we are and what we can do – Self­esteem – how we feel about the above – Children are routinely treated with much less respect than adults are – lecturing, bullying, bribing, and not listened to Discipline Goals Discipline Goals • Self­discipline – Children can’t learn to regulate their behavior as long as other people regulate for them – Being governed and guided by your own beliefs and understandings. – Kind to others out of personal feelings of respect for other humans. – Refers to the source of control – from within • Moral Autonomy Long­Term vs. Quick Fix Long­Term vs. Quick Fix • Help children live together peacefully now and prepare them for the future. • Children learn from experience to make wise decisions. • Develop positive self­esteem and moral autonomy needed to become competent, caring, loving and lovable people. Discipline Terms Discipline Terms • • • • Authoritarian Authoritative Permissive Indifferent • Boot camp • Factory – Reward and punishment – Gentler boot camp – Constructivist approach to assist development of moral autonomy • Community Obedience Models Obedience Models • • • • Authoritarian Behaviorist Boot Camp Autocratic Respect Models Respect Models • • • • Authoritative Constructivist Community Democratic Passive Models Passive Models • • • Permissive Maturationist Anarchist Discipline Goals Discipline Goals • Behaviorist – Molds behavior via rewards and punishment • Constructivist – Helps children learn from experience and from reflecting on experience – This assists the learner in gaining increasingly sophisticated levels of understanding. – Teaching children involves accepting immature thinking and requires working in conjunction with maturation to help children move to greater understanding so they can make good decisions for everyone involved. • Maturationist – Believes that time is the best teacher Constructivist Model Constructivist Model • Works toward moral autonomy – Self­determined, responsible behavior, reflecting concern for the good of others and for oneself as well. • Teaches children to think for themselves about desirable or undesirable actions rather than telling them predetermined answers to dilemmas. Constructivist Options Constructivist Options • Focus on teaching and begin with good human relationships • Adults who are responsive, warm and comforting • Adult responsible for setting limits and keeping children safe • Mutual caring and respect encourage children to think about the effects of their behavior • Teach children to think critically • Socially productive behavior Results Results • Authoritarian = anger, depression, low self­ esteem and inability to make self­directed choices • Permissive = low self­esteem and difficulty getting along with others • Constructivist = high self­esteem, good social skills, general competence and self­discipline Teaching for Moral Autonomy Teaching for Moral Autonomy • Mutual respect – quality of the relationship • Helping children understand why behavior is desirable or undesirable (pgs. 14­15) • Guiding age­appropriate choices and support solving own problems • Discipline efforts must address the cause of behavior – treating the cause not the symptom – Discipline is like weeding, if you don’t get the roots out with the weeds, the weeds will be back in a few days Causes of Behavior Problems Causes of Behavior Problems • See pages 17 & 18 Observations Observations • Observe carefully and record observations • Under what circumstances did the behavior occur • Is there a pattern? • Match probable causes of behavior with appropriate approaches to discipline Think about Think about • • • • Your personal discipline goals Your parent’s approach to child rearing Your level of autonomy Betsy grabs the play broom from Carlos, Carlos hits Betsy. – Describe our immediate and typical response – Describe a response that solves the problem and teaches autonomy and self­discipline ...
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This note was uploaded on 02/09/2011 for the course DFST 3123 taught by Professor Bradetich during the Spring '11 term at North Texas.

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