Goals - Elements of Argumentation

Goals - Elements of Argumentation - Goals &...

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Unformatted text preview: Goals & Elements of Argumentation alternatives:- evidence/proof- sub standpoint- support- premise- argumentation- reason- data Elements of Argumentation standpoint argument argument argument argument argument alternatives:- (main) claim- proposition- conclusion answer to y/n question (issue):- yes: pos. standp.- no: neg. standp. The vocabulary for the main elements in argumentation is varied, with sometimes many different terms for the same concept. This diagram shows the terminology that we will use most frequently during this course. The standpoint is also known as the main claim or proposition. This is the author s/an arguer s main point to which s/he wants the relevant decision makers to grant adherence. It can be seen as the answer to a yes/no question, also known as an issue (see the following slide for an extended example). The arguments are the propositions that contain support for the standpoint. They are the answers to the why question: why is the standpoint acceptable? or why do you believe that what you say in your standpoint is true? Finally: standpoint & argument boxes contain propositions arrows signify inferences alternatives:- evidence/proof- sub standpoint- support- premise- argumentation- reason- data Elements of Argumentation standpoint argument argument argument argument argument alternatives:- (main) claim- proposition- conclusion answer to y/n question (issue):- yes: pos. standp.- no: neg. standp. The vocabulary for the main elements in argumentation is varied, with sometimes many different terms for the same concept. This diagram shows the terminology that we will use most frequently during this course. The standpoint is also known as the main claim or proposition. This is the author s/an arguer s main point to which s/he wants the relevant decision makers to grant adherence. It can be seen as the answer to a yes/no question, also known as an issue (see the following slide for an extended example). The arguments are the propositions that contain support for the standpoint. They are the answers to the why question: why is the standpoint acceptable? or why do you believe that what you say in your standpoint is true? Finally: standpoint & argument boxes contain propositions arrows signify inferences propositions and inferences combine into an argumentation structure One of your own Examples the USA should not force democracy on other countries for instance, as in Afghanistan in some countries, the USAs attempts to create a democracy there have led to negative consequences for instance, as in Iraq (Richard s example from last week s introduction round) The standpoint is negative: it answers no to the question (issue), should the USA force democracy on other countries? (although in an actual debate that issue would probably be formulated more neutrally) Note how the two bottom arguments on the third level back up the main argument on the second level of the argumentation structure, which in turn backs up the standpoint on the Frst level. What is a Proposition?What is a Proposition?...
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Goals - Elements of Argumentation - Goals &...

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