Lecture14 - First Exam Tuesday March 11 5:00 pm 6:20 pm...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–9. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
First Exam Tuesday March 11 5:00 pm – 6:20 pm Physics Lecture Hall Closed book and notes Computer-graded multiple-choice questions Material covered: Text chapters 5.3, 6.1, 6.2, 16 - 21 Lectures 1-14 (January 22 through March 6) Bring Student ID card and a #2 pencil Practice Exam on class web page All necessary equations and constants will be given
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Make-Up Midterm Exam Open only to those with excused absences prior arrangement with faculty or Dean’s notes required Wednesday, March 26, 5:30 – 6:50 pm SEC 206 (Busch Campus) Covers the same material as the regular midterm exam
Background image of page 2
Previous Lecture Stellar mass black hole candidate: Cygnus X-1 Types of Binary stars optical double, visual, astrometric, spectroscopic, eclipsing, interacting Masses from binaries via Kepler’s 3 rd law P 2 = a 3 / (M 1 + M 2 ) mass-luminosity relation Sizes from eclipsing binaries via timing Compact object binaries – mass transfer effects
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Homework Question CQ 21.8 The stars in a binary system are a 4 M Sun main sequence star and a 1 M Sun red giant. Explain why this makes sense if the two stars are close together, but is inconsistent with what we know about stellar evolution if the stars are a wide pair. Close: the second star was originally more massive than the first, evolved off the main sequence, and transferred mass to the smaller star, so that now their mass ratio is reversed. Wide: no significant mass transfer can occur, so it is impossible for a 4 M Sun star to still be on a the main sequence if the 1 M Sun star has evolved into a red giant.
Background image of page 4
Homework Question CQ 21.22 What does mass exchange have to do with a type Ia supernova? In a binary, the more massive star evolves and ends up as a white dwarf. Later, its companion evolves, becomes a giant star, and transfers mass onto the WD. If enough mass is transferred to exceed the Chandrasekhar limit, the WD explodes as a type Ia supernova.
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
How Science Works In Thomas Kuhn’s view: A. Science proceeds as through an orderly cycle of hypothesis, experiment, and theory B. Science has two phases, normal and crisis C. Science should be based on physical laws that, once established, cannot be changed D. Science should be based purely on experiment, and theory has no role to play E. Science is a fraud and should be dismissed
Background image of page 6
Our Place in Space and Time Put the Sun in perspective: A. It is one of the largest and oldest of stars B. It is one of the smallest and youngest of stars C. It is as old as the Milky Way, but only a medium-size star D. It is in the middle of both the size and age range of stars E. It is near the middle of the age range of stars, but is one of the smallest
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Parallax We use parallax to measure a star’s: A. Distance B. Size C. Mass D. Luminosity E. All of the above
Background image of page 8
Image of page 9
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 35

Lecture14 - First Exam Tuesday March 11 5:00 pm 6:20 pm...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 9. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online