NJ weather _ climate lecture

NJ weather _ climate lecture - New Jersey's Weather &...

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New Jersey's Weather & Climate
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Optional Presentation Title David A. Robinson Climate System
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Optional Presentation Title David A. Robinson What Drives NJ's Weather/Climate System?
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Optional Presentation Title David A. Robinson The big picture: a NJ squeeze play
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Optional Presentation Title David A. Robinson Westerlies Figure 5-24 - not cell-like - rather a general west to east flow of wind in the upper atmosphere - a much less regular flow in that direction near the surface
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Optional Presentation Title David A. Robinson Polar Jet Stream Figure 5-27
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Optional Presentation Title David A. Robinson A mature mid-latitude cyclone
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Optional Presentation Title David A. Robinson Appreciating Variations & Extremes
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Optional Presentation Title David A. Robinson Maintaining an historic perspective
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Optional Presentation Title David A. Robinson The New Brunswick Tornado of June 19, 1835 The city of New Brunswick was the scene, on Friday afternoon last, of a most desolating tornado, which swept over its western section, causing much destruction of property, and, we regret to add, depriving several individuals of life. As far as we have been able to learn, the whirlwind or tornado first made its appearance with a falling of ice in the township of Amwell, near a place called Ringgold's [Ringoes], and taking an erratic zig-zag course, spent its fury over Staten Island, in the neighborhood of Rossville, and on the bay, by another fall of large irregular shaped pieces of ice. Its first approach to New Brunswick was from the north west, passing over Middlebush, about three miles from that place, where the dwelling and barn of John French were laid prostrate with the earth. It thence passed over the farm of David Dunn, about two and a half miles from New Brunswick, whose dwelling was unroofed, and the barn and other out-buildings were razed to the ground. The out-houses attached to the premises of J. G. Wyckoff, in the same vicinity, were also destroyed. The next building which felt its effects was the dwelling of Theophilus
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NJ weather _ climate lecture - New Jersey's Weather &...

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