Transportation_lecture

Transportation_lecture - Trains Planes Boats and...

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Unformatted text preview: Trains, Planes, Boats and Automobiles: Jersey Speaking istoric corridor From trails to horse and wagon travel Mapping NJ, 2009 Mapping NJ, 2009 Mapping NJ, 2009 NJ Canals: Morris Delaware & Raritan Out of state: Potomac, Erie, Pennsylvania Mapping NJ, 2009 Morris Canal Morris Canal- Phillipsburg to Newark: 1831- Newark to Jersey City: 1836- 106 miles long- anthracite "driven"- rather impractical: sea level to 914 feet above sea level (L. Hopatcong) to 155 feet (Delaware)- 23 locks, 23 inclined planes - never a success, but helped to reawaken Newark peak tonnage in 1866- drained in 1924 Delaware and Raritan Canal Delaware and Raritan Canal- Raven Rock (on Delaware) to Trenton (Bordentown spur too) to New Brunswick: 1834- 43 miles long- anthracite "driven"- vertical rise of 57 feet- easier and cheaper to build than Morris, 14 locks- at one point carried more tonnage than Erie Canal- peaked 1871- abandoned 1931- eventually acquired by state- today a state park and transports 20 million gallons of Delaware water a day for consumption...
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This note was uploaded on 02/08/2011 for the course GEOGRAPHY 101 taught by Professor Vancura during the Spring '08 term at Rutgers.

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Transportation_lecture - Trains Planes Boats and...

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