Who we are_where we live.lecture

Who we are_where we live.lecture - WHO WE ARE WHO AND WHERE...

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WHO WE ARE WHO WE ARE AND AND WHERE WE LIVE WHERE WE LIVE
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Population Characteristics Population Characteristics How many of us and where are we located? How many of us and where are we located?
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Growth by numbers 1690: 8,000 1790: 184,000 1890: 1,445,000 1990: 7,730,000 2000: 8,414,350 2006: 8,724,560
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Growth patterns Old core cities Ports: sea, river, canal Suburbs Railroad, highways Corridors
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Growth trends 1700s: W. Europe, other colonies 1800-1840: half of national, out migration 1840-1930: exceeds national, industry 1930s: out migration, urban families smaller than rural 1940s: come back
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1950s: largest numerical growth: 1,231,000, 25%, suburbs 1960s: growth down a bit to 18% 1970s: lowest in NJ history, 2.7%, slower suburbs, urban decline 1980s: 5% growth, half national 1990s: 8.6% growth, national = 13.1% 2000s: 6.1% growth, national = 10.6%
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Demographic transition Pre-industrial: birth and death rates high Industrializing: birth rate high, reduced death rate Industrial: reduced birth and death rates, immigration growth Highly urbanized: birth and death rates are low, international migration in, Sunbelt migration out, urban to suburban relocation
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Only 0.19% of New Jerseyans (0.8% of all Americans) are not immigrants or descendants of immigrants
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NJ has always been multi-ethnic and polycultural NJ at present is slightly less white than the nation Melting pot or Salad bowl???
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trends predict strong future growth among present racial and ethnic minorities
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This note was uploaded on 02/08/2011 for the course GEOGRAPHY 101 taught by Professor Vancura during the Spring '08 term at Rutgers.

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Who we are_where we live.lecture - WHO WE ARE WHO AND WHERE...

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