GenerationYwithnewattitude.docx

GenerationYwithnewattitude.docx - Written 11/8/2005...

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Written 11/8/2005 Generation Y: They've arrived at work with a new attitude By Stephanie Armour, USA TODAY They're young, smart, brash. They may wear flip-flops to the office or listen to iPods at their desk. They want to work, but they don't want work to be their life. Jennifer Lewis, 22, finds it awkward that older employees report expenses to her. By Eileen Blass, USA TODAY This is Generation Y, a force of as many as 70 million, and the first wave is just now embarking on their careers — taking their place in an increasingly multigenerational workplace. Get ready, because this generation — whose members have not yet hit 30 — is different from any that have come before, according to researchers and authors such as Bruce Tulgan, a founder of New Haven, Conn.-based RainmakerThinking, which studies the lives of young people.
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W h o i s G e n Y ? E f f e c
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This age group is moving into the labor force during a time of major demographic change, as companies around the USA face an aging workforce. Sixty-year-olds are working beside 20- year-olds. Freshly minted college graduates are overseeing employees old enough to be their parents. And new job entrants are changing careers faster than college students change their majors, creating frustration for employers struggling to retain and recruit talented high- performers. Unlike the generations that have gone before them, Gen Y has been pampered, nurtured and programmed with a slew of activities since they were toddlers, meaning they are both high- performance and high-maintenance, Tulgan says. They also believe in their own worth. "Generation Y is much less likely to respond to the traditional command-and-control type of management still popular in much of today's workforce," says Jordan Kaplan, an associate managerial science professor at Long Island University-Brooklyn in New York. "They've grown up questioning their parents, and now they're questioning their employers. They don't know how to shut up, which is great, but that's aggravating to the 50-year-old manager who says, 'Do it and do it now.' " That speak-your-mind philosophy makes sense to Katie Patterson, an assistant account executive at Edelman Public Relations in Atlanta. The 23-year-old, who hails from Iowa and now lives with two roommates in a town home, likes to collaborate with others, and says many of her friends want to run their own businesses so they can be independent. "We are willing and not afraid to challenge the status quo," she says. "An environment where
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This note was uploaded on 02/09/2011 for the course MKTG 301 taught by Professor Staff during the Fall '08 term at George Mason.

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GenerationYwithnewattitude.docx - Written 11/8/2005...

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