Nov._30_-_Supported_Employment

Nov._30_-_Supported_Employment -...

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Unformatted text preview: 11/30/09 Impact
of
Disabili/es
 Workplace
 Perspec/ves
on
Workplace
Environments
  Employers/businesses
  Mo/vated
by

  Providing
service
  Making
profit
  Must
consider
the
cost
of
charges
  Workforce
sa/sfac/on
  Addi/onal
markets
  Most
support
elimina/ng
discrimina/on
  Employees
  Percep/ons
of
discrimina/on
are
present
  Inves/ga/ons
oAen
don’t
support
80%
of
reported
 instances
of
discrimina/on

 Making
the
Workplace
Work
  Consider
the
tasks
to
be
done
  What
are
the
tasks?
  How
the
tasks
are
completed?
  What
knowledge
and
skills
required
to
do
the
tasks?
  What
are
tradi/onal
ways
the
tasks
have
been
done?
  What
are
alterna/ve
ways
to
address
the
tasks?
  Does
the
worker
have
the
necessary
knowledge
and
 skills?
  Can
the
worker
access
the
workplace?
  Are
adapta/ons
needed?

How
will
they
help?

  Consider
the
worker
 1 11/30/09 Supported
Employment
   Supported
employment
addresses
the
worker
and
the
 workplace.
   Originally
developed
primarily
for
people
with
intellectual
 disabili/es
  Paid,
compe//ve
employment
  Demonstrated
inability
to
gain
and
maintain
employment
   Occurs
in
various
normal,
integrated
business
environments
   Includes
  Support
to
get
and
keep
jobs
  APen/on
to
career
development
  APen/on
to
diversifying
the
workplace
 Benefits
of
Supported
Employment
   For
employers
and
the
 public
  Increase
in
willing
 members
of
the
workforce
  Opportuni/es
for
long‐ term
support
  Training
and
retaining
 employees
   For
employees
  Increased
sense
of
dignity
 related
to
employment
  Chances
for
upward
 mobility
  Decrease
in
un‐
or
under‐ employment
  Increased
wages
  Decreased
dependence
 on
public
assistance
  Increased
contribu/ons
to
 society
through
taxes
paid
  Decreased
cost
for
service
 provision
 Emergence
of
Supported
 Employment
   1960‐70
   Sheltered
workshops
   Adult
ac/vity
centers
   Ins/tu/ons
   Emphasis
on
severe
 disabili/es
   1980‐90
   Support
for
programs
is
 provided
in
legisla/on
   All
types
of
disabili/es
are
 covered
   Programs
available
na/onally
   Job
coach
model
popularized
   100,000
people
in
programs
   1970‐80
   Research
on
integrated
work
 placements
begins
   Focus
is
on
MR
   Term
“job
coach”
is
coined
   “Normaliza/on”
leads
to
 decreased
ins/tu/onaliza/on
   1990‐2000
   ADA
passed

   Emphasis
on
community
 business
and
natural
supports
   Growing
popularity
worldwide
 2 11/30/09 Types
of
Workplace
Supports
 •  •  •  •  Agency
mediated
 Business
mediated
 Government
mediated
 Consumer
and
Family
mediated 

 Types
of
Workplace
Supports:

Agency
 Mediated
 Agency mediation coordinates services among entities.   Assis/ve
technology:

device needs to match skills and need of use   Compensatory
strategies:

help compensate for disability considering demands of work environment   High
or
low
tech
   Devices,
services,
or
adapta/ons
   Specialized
services:

 mul8disciplinary exper8se   Counseling/mental
health
   Medical
programs
   Transporta/on
   On‐site
services
   Skills
training
   Social
skills
   Advocacy
   Job
coach
model
   Memory
aids
   Addi/onal
/me
to
complete
tasks
   Checklists
   Loca/on
makers
   Services
vary
with
disability
and
 type
of
business
   Success
demonstrated
with
all
 types
and
severi/es
of
disabili/es
 Types
of
Workplace
Supports:

 Business
Mediated
 Business Mediated supports are administered “in house” by the employer.  Accommoda/ons
  Co‐worker
and
employer
 supports
  Social
integra/on
  Mentoring/training
by
co‐ workers
  Technology
  Environmental
or
schedule
 modifica/ons
  Job
restructuring
  Company‐developed
 programs
and
policies
  Case
management:

 iden/fy
ways
to
facilitate
 “fit”
between
job,
 environment,
and
worker
  Disability
consultants
  Supports
employee
by
 addressing
disability‐ related
issues
  Can
also
supports
 supervisors
and
 coworkers
(training
and
 educa/on)
 3 11/30/09 Types
of
Workplace
Supports:

 Government
Mediated
 Government-mediated supports are not specific, individually designed strategies.   Policies
and
prac/ces
 that
enhance
 employment
 opportuni/es
for
people
 with
disabili/es
   Incen/ves
for
hiring
   Examples:
   ADA
   Rehabilita/on
Act

   Technology‐Related
 Assistance
for
Individuals
 with
Disabili/es
Act
   Addi/onal
supports
 include
implemented
by
 the
Social
Security
 Administra/on
   Referrals
to
rehab
services
   Trial
work
periods
   Extended
eligibility
for

 Medicare
   Deduc/ng
disability‐ related
work
expenses
 from
taxable
income
 Types
of
Workplace
Supports:

 Consumer
and
Family
Mediated
 •  Family
supports
include
both
training
and
 facilita/on
for
the
individual
with
a
 disability
 –  Informal
care
(general
support;
job‐related
 skills
training)
 –  Selec/on
and
use
of
AT
devices
 –  Family
involvement
in
support
programs
 –  Influenced
by
ethnic
and
cultural
expecta/ons
 •  Consumer
supports:

grew from independent living movement
 –  Consumer
self‐direc/on
–
making
choices
and
 Types
of
Supported
Employment
 •  Group
placements
 •  Individual
placements
 4 11/30/09 Types
of
Supported
Employment
 •  Group
placements
 –  Facility‐based
 –  Advantages
 •  Security
for
family
and
people
with
disabili/es
 –  Day
program
VS
staying
at
home
 •  Consistency:

built
around
a
rou/ne
 •  Safety:

well‐supervised
environment
 Types
of
Group
Placements
   Enclave
   3
–
8
employees
   Permanent,
full‐/me
supervisor
   Regular
community‐based
 businesses/industries
         3
–
8
employees
 1
–
2
supervisors
 Specialized
contract
services
 Move
from
site
to
site
   Entrepreneurial
Model
   Mobile
work
crew
   Dispersed/Cluster
Op/on
   Agency‐provided
full‐/me
 supervisor
   Employees
hired
by
business
   Started
in
small
business
ventures
   Subcontracts
with
agencies
 represen/ng
people
with
 disabili/es
to
support
businesses
   OAen
involved
assembly
or
 benchwork

   Currently,
people
with
disabili/es
 are
more
involved
as
 entrepreneurs
themselves
(move away from groups as well as from placements)   Owning/opera/ng
businesses
   Requires
ability
to
aPract
 clients
or
contracts
   Opportuni/es
through
 technology
   hPp:// www.assis/veware.com/ videos.php?video=Leigh‐ Anne&format=mov
   hPp://www.cafepress.com/ graphics_afoot
 Individual
Placements
 •  Person‐centered
approach
to
supported
 employment
 •  Takes
the
focus
away
from
the
business,
 employer,
or
facility
 •  Emphasizes
the
person’s
goals
and
abili/es
 5 11/30/09 Individual
Placement
 Values inherent in person-centered supported employment   Presump/on
of
employment
   Compe//ve
employment
   Comparable
wages
   Importance
of
rela/onships
   Social
aspect
of
workplace
   Leads
to
acceptance
and
 respect
   Control
   Focus
on
capacity
and
 capability
   Choose
and
regulate
own
 supports
   Decisions
are
not
made
by
 the
employment
 “professional”
   Leads
to
employment
 sa/sfac/on
   Focus
on
abili/es,
not
on
 disabili/es
   What
can
this
person
   Power
of
supports
   Proper
supports
provide
 opportuni/es
for
people
with
 disabili/es
to
achieve
their
 poten/al
 Individual
Placement
 •  Best
prac/ces
in
person‐centered
supported
 employment
 –  Choice
 –  Control
 –  Careers
 –  Full‐inclusion
 –  Long‐term
supports
 Individual
Placement
 •  Choice
 –  People
with
disabili/es
 are
oAen
not
given
 opportuni/es
to
make
 decisions
 •  Do
not
develop
decision
 making
skills
 •  Do
not
know
how
to
 gather
informa/on
 needed
to
make
decisions
 •  Might
be
restricted
by
 agency
regula/ons,
etc.
 •  Control
 –  Self‐determina/on
is
 important
for
individual
 success
 –  Choose
service
providers
 –  Choose
services
 –  Determine
own
goals
 –  Freedom to act on their choices

 6 11/30/09 Individual
Placement
  Careers
  Not
“stuck”
in
same
 posi/on
indefinitely
  Success
not
measured
 by
/me
on
a
job
  Addi/onal
career
 development
  Includes
  Full‐inclusion
  Learning
to
market
 services
  Being
involved
in
 con/nuous
assessment
 of
current
workplace
  Looking
for
 advancement
or
 expanding
knowledge/ skills,
etc.
  Long‐term
supports
  Emphasis
on
 rela/onships
  Social
aspect
of
 workplace
  Building
rela/onships
in
 business
and
social
 senngs
  Reten/on
in
posi/ons
  Termina/on
of
services
 is
not
addressed
  Fluid
condi/on
of
 individuals
and
 workplaces
 Individual
Placement
 •  Roles
of
employment
specialist
 –  Planner
 –  Consultant
 –  Head
hunter
 –  Technician
 –  Community
resource
 Individual
Placement
  Planner
  Analyze
services
sought
 by
client
  Develop
plan
for
 reaching
goals
  Map
out
ac/vi/es
  Iden/fy
poten/al
 supports
  Schedule
mee/ngs
with
 organiza/ons
  Iden/fy
resources
  Assess
workplaces
   Consultant
   Head
hunter
   Provide
recommenda/ons
based
 upon
expert
knowledge
   Involved
in
marke/ng
ac/vi/es
   Know
community
labor
market


   Par/cipate
in
advisory
boards
   Keep
files
on
community
 employers
   Make
calls
on
local
businesses
 7 11/30/09 Individual
Placement
 •  Technician
 –  Iden/fy
needed
skills
 needed
for
accessing,
 retaining,
and
advancing

 –  Teach
skills
and
provide
 support
un/l
 independence
is
 achieved
 –  Ex:

using
public
 transporta/on
 •  Community
resource
 –  Have
thorough
 knowledge
of
the
 community
 –  Inves/gate
poten/al
 resources
for
supports
 •  •  •  •  •  Businesses
 Recrea/on
 Housing
 Social

 Etc.
 8 ...
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This note was uploaded on 02/10/2011 for the course EEX 2000 taught by Professor Elizabethfilippi during the Spring '11 term at University of Florida.

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