Mod1 Art1 - Module 1 --- Article 1 QUICKSTATS OBESITY AMONG...

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Unformatted text preview: Module 1 --- Article 1 QUICKSTATS OBESITY AMONG ADULTS The findings presented below are estimates, based on data from the 2007–2008 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES). 5555 adults (aged 20 or older) in the United States participated in face-to-face interviews. The weight categories used in this survey study are based on the following body mass index (BMI) ranges: overweight (BMI 25.0–29.9), obese (BMI greater than or equal to 30.0), and extremely obese [a subcategory of obese] (BMI greater than or equal to 40.0). BMI can be calculated by using the following formula: [weight in kilograms] divided by [height in meters, squared]. (To calculate BMI using pounds for weight and inches for height, go to http://www.nhlbisupport.com/bmi.)1 • In 2007–2008, among adults aged 20 years and older, it is estimated that 34.2% were overweight, 33.8% were obese, and 5.7% were extremely obese. The rates of obesity were similar between men (32.2%) and women (35.5%). The table below shows trends in obesity and overweight prevalence between 1988–1994 and 2007–2008. • The prevalence of overweight has remained stable since at least as far back as 1960–1962, when 31.5% of adults were overweight.2 However, the prevalence of obesity among adults in 2007–2008 was 2½ times the prevalence 1960–1962, when 13.4% of adults were obese. The prevalence of extreme obesity among adults in 2007–2008 was 6 times the prevalence in 1960–1962, when 0.9% of adults were extremely obese. • Prevalence of obesity differed by race/ethnicity among women. Non-Hispanic black women were more likely to be obese than Non-Hispanic white women (49.6% vs 33.0%). Also, Mexican-American women were more likely to be obese than non-Hispanic white women (45.1% vs 33.0%). Race/ethnicity differences in obesity were not observed in men. Prevalence of Overweight, Obesity, and Extreme Obesity Among US Adults Aged 20 and Older Weight Status Overweight Obese Extremely Obese 1 1988–1994 33.1% 22.9% 2.9% 1999–2000 34.0% 30.5% 4.7% 2001–2002 35.1% 30.6% 5.1% 2003–2004 34.1% 32.2% 4.8% 2005–2006 32.7% 34.3% 5.9% 2007–2008 34.2% 33.8% 5.7% The following are examples of weight categories that pertain to people of differing heights and weights [not including pregnant women]: Overweight: 5’0” (128 to 153 lb); 5’3” (141 to 169 lb); 5’6” (155 to 185 lb); 5’9” (169 to 202 lb); 6’0” (184 to 220 lb). Obesity: 5’0” (153 lb or more); 5’3” (170 lb or more); 5’6” (186 lb or more); 5’9” (203 lb or more); 6’0” (221 lb or more). Extreme Obesity [subcategory of obesity]: 5’0” (205 lb or more); 5’3” (226 lb or more); 5’6” (248 lb or more); 5’9” (271 lb or more); 6’0” (295 lb or more). Estimates from 1960–1962 applied to adults aged 20 to 74. For the purpose of comparison, 2007–2008 data from participants older than 74 were excluded. In 2007–2008, for example, the prevalence of overweight, obese, and extremely obese were 33.6%, 34.3%, and 6.0% respectively. 2 SOURCE: National Center for Health Statistics [NCHS] (Ogden CL & Carroll MD). Prevalence of Overweight, Obesity, and Extreme Obesity Among Adults: United States, Trends 1976-1980 Through 2007-2008. NCHS Health E-Stat (June 2010); http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/hestat/obesity_adult_07_08/obesity_adult_07_08.htm. [NCHS is a component of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).] Prevalence of Obesity of Adults—by State (also Wash DC and Territories) The following are estimates of the percentage of individuals who were obese or extremely obese in 2009. The data are from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS), a collaborative project of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and US states and territories. Additional details are available online at http://apps.nccd.cdc.gov/ brfss/list.asp?cat=OB&yr=2009&qkey=4409&state=All. 19%–24.9%: Colorado (19.0), Connecticut (21.0), DC (20.1), Hawaii (22.9), Massachusetts (21.8), Montana (23.7), New Jersey (23.9), New York (24.6), Oregon (23.6), Rhode Island (24.9), Utah (24.0), and Vermont (23.4). 25%–29.9%: Alaska (25.4), Arizona (25.9), California (25.5), Delaware (27.6), Florida (26.5), Georgia (27.7), Guam (26.8), Idaho (25.1), Illinois (27.4), Iowa (28.5), Kansas (28.8), Maine (26.4), Maryland (26.8), Minnesota (25.4), Nebraska (28.1), Nevada (26.4), New Hampshire (26.3), New Mexico (25.6), N Dakota (28.4), Ohio (29.8), Pennsylvania (28.1), Puerto Rico (27.5), Texas (29.5), Virgin Islands (29.6), Virginia (25.5), Washington (26.9), Wisconsin (29.2), and Wyoming (25.4). 30%+: Alabama (31.6), Arkansas (31.5), Indiana (30.0), Kentucky (32.4), Louisiana (33.9), Michigan (30.3), Mississippi (35.4), Missouri (30.6), N Carolina (30.1), Oklahoma (32.0), S Carolina (30.1), S Dakota (30.3), Tennessee (32.9), and W Virginia (31.7). ©Copyright 2011 MWK Publishing LLC; from The Complete Practitioner: Mental Health Applications (Vol. 13, No. 8 -- August 2010) For next article, go to next page. ...
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This note was uploaded on 02/10/2011 for the course PCO 4930 taught by Professor Neimeyer during the Spring '09 term at University of Florida.

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