Mod1 Art4 - Module 1 Article 4 TREATMENT HIGHLIGHTS EATING...

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Unformatted text preview: Module 1 --- Article 4 TREATMENT HIGHLIGHTS EATING DISORDERS Dieting among adolescents is found to be associated with the subsequent development of symptoms of eating disorders. In a 3-year study of adolescent health in Australia, data on the relationship between a number of variables and subsequent development of eating disorder symptoms were collected on 1,947 adolescents (initially 14-15 years of age) from 44 schools. Weight, height, mental status, and dieting and exercise behaviors were assessed at 6-month intervals over the 3-year period. Presence of eating disorder symptoms was also assessed at each interval. In this study, the adolescents were characterized as having an eating disorder if they met at least 2 diagnostic criteria for anorexia nervosa or bulimia nervosa. (The criteria used were those from DSM-IV: Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th Edition.) At the beginning of the study, 8% of the girls reported dieting at a severe level, and an additional 60% reported dieting at a moderate level. In contrast, 0.5% of the boys reported dieting at a severe level, and 29% reported dieting at a moderate level. Also at the beginning of the study, eating disorders were 9 times more common among the girls than among the boys. During the course of the study, 6.6% of the girls and 1.2% of the boys were characterized as having an eating disorder during at least one 6-month assessment period. Girls who reported dieting at a severe level were 18 times more likely to develop a new eating disorder within the subsequent 6-month assessment period than those who did not diet. Girls who reported dieting at a moderate level were 5 times more likely to develop a new eating disorder within the subsequent 6-month assessment period than those who did not diet. Girls who reported dieting at a severe level who also had high levels of psychiatric symptoms had a 28% chance of developing an eating disorder within 12 months. Exercise was not found to be related to eating disorders.* The authors comment that, “In adolescent weight control, promotion of exercise rather than restriction of dietary intake may prove less of a risk in the development of eating disorders.” *The authors cite previous reports that have suggested that participation in certain sports (eg, gymnastics) may be a risk factor for eating disorders. The current study did not examine the impact of specific sports activities on the development of eating disorders. Patton GC, Selzer R, Coffey C, Carlin JB, & Wolfe R. Onset of adolescent eating disorders: Population based cohort study over 3 years. British Medical Journal, 318:765-768, 1999. Support: Victorian Health Promotion Foundation; National Health and Research Council. ©Copyright 2011 MWK Publishing LLC; from The Complete Practitioner: Mental Health Applications (Vol. 2, No. 11 -- November 1999) For next article, go to next page. ...
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This note was uploaded on 02/10/2011 for the course PCO 4930 taught by Professor Neimeyer during the Spring '09 term at University of Florida.

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