Mod2 Art3 - Module 2 Article 3 TREATMENT HIGHLIGHTS FREQUENCY OF FAMILY MEALS AND DISORDERED EATING AMONG ADOLESCENTS Among adolescent girls

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Unformatted text preview: Module 2 --- Article 3 TREATMENT HIGHLIGHTS FREQUENCY OF FAMILY MEALS AND DISORDERED EATING AMONG ADOLESCENTS Among adolescent girls, regularly having family meals is found to be associated with a lower risk of engaging in extreme weight control behaviors. This 5-year longitudinal study examined associations between the frequency with which adolescents ate meals with their family and disordered eating behaviors in adolescents. The participants were an ethnically and socioeconomically diverse sample of middle and high school students from 31 Minnesota schools. The students completed a survey of eating- and family-related questions and underwent physical assessments (eg, height and weight) in school. Five years later, they completed a survey that was mailed to them. Slightly over half (2516) of the original 4746 participants completed the second survey. Among adolescent girls, regularly having family meals (ie, at least 5 meals per week) was found to be associated with a 29% lower risk of engaging in extreme weight control behaviors (eg, self-induced vomiting; use of laxatives, diet pills, or diuretics) 5 years later, even after statistically adjusting for sociodemographic characteristics, body mass index, family connectedness, parental encouragement to diet, and extreme weight control behaviors at the initial assessment. (The risk of engaging in extreme weight control behaviors was calculated to be higher when those statistical adjustments were not made.) Among adolescent boys, regularly having family meals was not associated with a lower risk of engaging in extreme weight control behaviors. However, not regularly having family meals was found to be associated with 2 types of unhealthy weight control behaviors: skipping meals and eating very little food. The authors conclude that “the high prevalence of disordered eating behaviors among adolescent girls and the protective role of family meals suggest a need for interventions aimed at promoting family meals. Further exploration of predictors of disordered eating behaviors in adolescent boys and the role of family meals is warranted.” Neumark-Sztainer D, Eisenberg ME, Fulkerson JA, Story M, & Larson N. Family meals and disordered eating in adolescents: Longitudinal findings from Project EAT. Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine, 162:17-22, 2008. Support: Maternal and Child Health Bureau of the US Dept of HHS; General Mills. ©Copyright 2011 MWK Publishing LLC; from The Complete Practitioner: Mental Health Applications (Vol. 11, No. 6 -- June 2008) For next article, go to next page. ...
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This note was uploaded on 02/10/2011 for the course PCO 4930 taught by Professor Neimeyer during the Spring '09 term at University of Florida.

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