Mod3 Art8 - Module 3 Article 8 TREATMENT HIGHLIGHTS OBESITY...

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Unformatted text preview: Module 3 --- Article 8 TREATMENT HIGHLIGHTS OBESITY Requiring physical activity prior to television viewing may play a role in reducing childhood obesity. In a preliminary study, the effect of contingent TV on physical activity and on TV viewing was studied in 10 obese children (ages 8 to 12) over a 10-week treatment period. Children were eligible to participate if they watched at least 2 hours of TV per day and did not engage in regular physical activity. Children were randomly assigned to either the treatment condition (TV viewing was contingent on pedaling a stationary cycle) or the control condition (stationary cycle was present in the house, but TV viewing was not contingent on its use). Of the 6 children assigned to the contingent TV condition, the first 3 children were required to pedal for 1 minute for every minute of TV viewing. Because these children perceived this level as too difficult, the remaining 3 children were required to pedal for 1 minute for every 2 minutes of TV viewing. Pedaling and TV viewing were measured through a microcomputer installed in the stationary cycle. Over the treatment period, children with contingent TV viewing pedaled, on average, more than children in the control condition (64.4 minutes per week vs 8.3 minutes per week). Children with contingent TV viewing also watched less TV compared to children in the control condition (1.6 hours per week vs 21.0 hours per week). Children with contingent TV viewing also had greater reductions in total body fat (-1.2%) and leg fat (-1.6%) compared to children in the control condition (+0.9% total body fat and +0.7% leg fat). The authors note that “the fact that significant behavior change was observed in a small sample treated for a relatively short time demonstrates the potential power of environmental modification for inducing immediate change.” They further note that “contingent TVs per se do not necessarily need to be used” and suggest that families could be helped to “reconstruct healthier home environments that reward moderate increases in physical activity that partially substitute for TV viewing.” Faith MS, Berman N, Heo M, Pietrobelli A, Gallagher D, Epstein LH, Eiden MT, & Allison DB. Effects of contingent television on physical activity and television viewing in obese children. Pediatrics, 107:1043-1048, 2001. Support: National Institutes of Health. © Copyright 2011 MWK Publishing LLC; from The Complete Practitioner: Mental Health Applications (Vol. 4, No. 6 -- June 2001) ...
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This note was uploaded on 02/10/2011 for the course PCO 4930 taught by Professor Neimeyer during the Spring '09 term at University of Florida.

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