6 Water and Heat 3

6 Water and Heat 3 - Water 1.00 cal/g o C Alcohol 0.52 Oil...

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alcohol water Thermometers
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Heat Capacity When heat is added to water, the molecules speed up or vibrate more freely. This disturbs hydrogen bonds, but causes only a small change in temperature, because much of the heat energy is used to break or disrupt the hydrogen bonds The amount of heat input required to raise the temperature of a 1 g of a substance by 1 o C.
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Heat capacity of Water 1 Cal g . o C It requires 1 calorie of heat input to raise the temperature of 1 g of water by 1 degree Celsius 1 g of water is equal to 1 mL
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Heat Capacity of Liquids
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Unformatted text preview: Water 1.00 cal/g o C Alcohol 0.52 Oil 0.38 Mercury 0.03 The amount of heat (calories) required raise the temperature of a given amount of a substance by 1 o Celsius. Temperatures of large standing bodies of water remain relatively constant. This thermal buffering protects life on Earth from otherwise possibly lethal temperature fluctuations. 80 o F 45 o F 110 o F 45 o F Why does Florida typically receive rain in the afternoon during the summer? Heat Capacity and Florida Climate...
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6 Water and Heat 3 - Water 1.00 cal/g o C Alcohol 0.52 Oil...

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