10 Salinity and Carbon

10 Salinity and Carbon - Ocean Water Why is the ocean...

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Unformatted text preview: Ocean Water Why is the ocean salty? Why is the ocean salty? What is a salt? Salts are made from Ions Elements Electrons (-) Protons (+) Elements in the periodic table have equal numbers of protons (+) and electrons (-). They are electrically neutral Ions Ions are stable forms of elements that acquire an electrical charge by gaining or losing electrons Elemental Sodium (Na) 11 protons (+), 11 electrons (-) Sodium ion (Na + ) 11 protons (+), 10 electrons (-) By losing an electron, sodium has more protons than electrons and becomes positively charged. Na - 1e-= Na + Na 11 protons e-e-e-e-e-e-e-e-e-e-e-+ Na + Sodium Na 2Na + 2H 2 2Na + + 2 OH-+ H 2 http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=-2158222101210607510&ei=syO5SuaVBJLiqgKWif37AQ&q=sodium+explosion&hl=en# Ions Ions are stable forms of elements that acquire an electrical charge by gaining or losing electrons Elemental Chlorine (Cl) 17 protons (+), 17 electrons (-) Chloride ion (Cl-) 17 protons (+), 18 electrons (-) By gaining an electron, chlorine has more electrons than protons and becomes negatively charged. Cl + 1e-= Cl-Cl 17 protons e-e-e-e-e-e-e-e-e-e-e-e-e-e-e-e-e-e-_ Cl-Chlorine Elements that lose electrons and become positively charged are called cations . Na + , K + , Ca 2+ , Mg 2+ , Cu 2+ , Fe 3+ Elements that gain electrons and become negatively charged are called anions . Cl-, Br-, F-, I-CO 3 2-, SO 4 2-, PO 4-3 oxoanions Salts KCl, NaCl, MgCl 2 , CaCO 3 , CaSO 4 Cations: K + , Na + , Mg 2+ , Ca 2+ Anions: Cl-, CO 3-2 , SO 4-2 Salts are formed by combining cations and anions to form solids that have no charge. K + + Cl- = KCl Na + + Cl- = NaCl Conversely, if solid salts are mixed with water they dissolve and the ions go into solution KCl K + + Cl-NaCl Na + + Cl-Water Water solid solution CaCO 3 CaSO 4 Ca +2 and CO 3-2 Ca +2 and SO 4-2 NaCl Cl-Na + Na Cl Cl Cl Cl Dissolution Oceans have enormous amounts of salt (ions) dissolved in the water....
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This note was uploaded on 02/10/2011 for the course SWS 2007 taught by Professor bonczek during the Fall '09 term at University of Florida.

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10 Salinity and Carbon - Ocean Water Why is the ocean...

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