CHM - I NORGANIC NOMENCLATURE Chemistry is a lot like...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
INORGANIC NOMENCLATURE Chemistry is a lot like living in a foreign country. If you speak the language, life is more fun! Learning inorganic nomenclature is the first step toward learning the language of chemistry. Learning the relationship between chemical formulas and chemical names is essential for understanding chemical problems. Inorganic nomenclature is a systematic way of naming the thousands of inorganic compounds which we encounter. Your textbook discusses nomenclature of inorganic compounds in sections3.2;QA. This handout is intended to supplement and complement There are certain elements, cations, and anions that you MUST know before you get started. MEMORIZE these names and formulas; it's as simple as that! For any name you should be able to write the formula and for any formula you should be able to write the name (including spelling.) 1. The first 36 elements and Au, U, Ag, Sn, Hg, and Pb. 2. Compounds with common names H20 - water H202 - hydrogen peroxide NH3 - ammonia 3. Cations Names Lithium ion, sodium ion, etc. Beryllium ion, magnesium ion, etc. Hydronium ion Aluminum ion Iron (111) Copper ( 1) , Copper (11) Silver ion Mercury (I) , Mercury (11) Lead (11) , Lead (IV) Ammonium
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
4. Common Monatomic Anions Name Hydride Fluoride Chloride Bromide Iodide Oxide Sulfide 5. Common Polyatomic Anions (Two or more atoms) Formula Nitrate Sulfate Permanganate Carbonate ~0~'- Hydroxide Chromate Cyanide Phosphate PO - Perchlorate Peroxide Thiocyanate Chlorate C103 - 6. Acids Perchloric HClO4 Chloric HC10 3 - Hydrobromic HBr Hydroiodic HI Sulfuric Phosphoric Nitric Hydrochloric 7. Bases Lithium hydroxide LiOH Sodium hydroxide NaOH Potassium hydroxide KOH Cesium hydroxide CsOH Rubidium hydroxide RbOH Magnesium hydroxide Mg (OH) 2 Calcium hydroxide Ca (OH) 2 Strontium hydroxide Sr (OH) There are four main classes of inorganic compounds we will learn how to name: 1. Compounds made from single valence metals. 2. Compounds made from multivalent metals. 3. Compounds containing only nonmetallic elements. Acids.
Background image of page 2
COMPOUNDS MADE FROM SINGLE VALENCE METALS In general, these compounds are made using at least one of the metals in Groups IA, IIA, and IIIA. These metals donate electrons readily (they have a low ionization energy) and always have oxidation numbers corresponding to their group number. For example, K, Na, Cs, etc., have oxidation numbers of +1 onlv. All we have to do is specify the cation (the ionic metal) followed by the anion. We must also ensure that the sum of the oxidation numbers is zero (for we are dealing with neutral molecules). Here are some examples: NaH BaF 2 HCN sodium hydride cesium oxide barium fluoride hydrogen cyanide strontium nitride Ca (OH) calcium hydroxide lithium phosphate magnesium sulfate NOW, you try a couple! b. magnesium fluoride In question (a), the cation is Na+ (sodium) and the anion is Cr04'- (chromate) .
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 02/10/2011 for the course CHM 2046 taught by Professor Veige/martin during the Spring '07 term at University of Florida.

Page1 / 14

CHM - I NORGANIC NOMENCLATURE Chemistry is a lot like...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online