transpiration_lab

transpiration_lab - Modified AP Biology Transpiration Lab...

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Modified AP Biology Transpiration Lab Kathryn Weatherhead, Hilton Head High School Developed for AP Biology Summer Institute, NC State University Name ________________________________ Background: Leaves are always losing water and drying out. Terrestrial plants must move water from the soil into their roots; from the root tissue up through their stems to their leaf tissue; and finally out through the stomata in leaves into the atmosphere. This process is driven by evaporation , since loss of water in the leaves “pulls” on chains of water molecules in surrounding tissue all the way down to the roots. This creates tension. The cohesive force created by hydrogen bonds between water molecules, and the adhesive attraction of water molecules to cellulose in plant tissues maintains these unbroken chains and keeps the tension from breaking the chains of water molecules. The movement of water upward in a thin tube is sometimes called capillary action. Evaporation lowers water potential in leaf tissue pulls water by osmosis from surrounding tissue pulls on water in stems pulls on water in roots roots pull in water by osmosis from soil. Roots can take in soil water as long as the water potential in the roots is lower than the
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transpiration_lab - Modified AP Biology Transpiration Lab...

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