Early_Christian_Art_Study

Early_Christian_Art_Study - Early Christian Art Study Guide...

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Early Christian Art Study Guide - During the 3 rd and 4 th centuries people began rejecting Polytheism in favor of a monotheistic religion. - Prior to the Edict of Milan issued by Constantine in 313 AD the most significant Christian monuments were underground catacombs . - The Edict of Milan ended the persecution of Christians. Catacombs - Tunneled out of tufa bedrock. - Not elaborate like the Etruscan tumulus. - Christians had to be buried outside of the city walls. - Contained as many as 4 million bodies. - Openings called Loculi were cut into the walls on top of each other to contain bodies. - Small rooms called Cubicula served as mortuary temples. - ceilings were painted with frescoes depicting Old Testament stories. o Orants – praying figures, arms raised in prayer. o Prior to Christianity becoming the official religion, Christ is shown as a teacher or as the Good Shepherd. After becoming the official religion he is depicted with a halo, purple robe, and throne. All Christians rejected cremation.
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This note was uploaded on 02/08/2011 for the course ART 101 taught by Professor Helm during the Spring '11 term at DeVry Austin.

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Early_Christian_Art_Study - Early Christian Art Study Guide...

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