Chapter 11

Chapter 11 - Attitudes and I nfluencing Attitudes Chapter...

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Unformatted text preview: Attitudes and I nfluencing Attitudes Chapter 11 Rutgers Business School Consumer Behavior Class Spring 2010 (Livingston Campus) Chapter Outline What Are Attitudes? Structural Models of Attitudes Attitude Formation Strategies of Attitude Changes Behavior Can Precede or Follow Attitude Formation Attitude A learned predisposition to behave in a consistently favorable or unfavorable manner with respect to a given object. A Company Which Specializes in Attitude Measurement What Are Attitudes? The attitude “object” Attitudes are a learned predisposition Attitudes have consistency Attitudes occur within a situation This attempts to change the attitude toward calcium in a soft drink situation. Structural Models of Attitudes Tricomponent Attitude Model Multiattribute Attitude Model The Trying-to-Consume Model Attitude-Toward-the-Ad Model Cognition A Simple Representation of the Tricomponent Attitude Model The Tricomponent Model Cognitive Affective Conative The knowledge and perceptions that are acquired by a combination of direct experience with the attitude object and related information from various sources Components The Tricomponent Model Cognitive Affective Conative A consumer’s emotions or feelings about a particular product or brand Components The Tricomponent Model Cognitive Affective Conative (Behavioral) The likelihood or tendency that an individual will undertake a specific action or behave in a particular way with regard to the attitude object Components Discussion Question Explain your attitude toward your college (university) based on the tricomponent attribute model. Be sure to isolate the cognitive, affective, and conative elements Multiattribute Multiattribute Attitude Attitude Models Models Attitude models that examine the composition of consumer attitudes in terms of selected product attributes or beliefs. Multiattribute Attitude Models...
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This note was uploaded on 02/08/2011 for the course MKT 374 taught by Professor Watson during the Spring '10 term at Rutgers.

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Chapter 11 - Attitudes and I nfluencing Attitudes Chapter...

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