Chapters 5 & 6

Chapters 5 & 6 - Consumer Behavior Chapter 5: The...

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Consumer Behavior Chapter 5: The Changing American Society: Subcultures Chapter 6: The American Society: Families and HHs
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Subcultures Although American society has always contained numerous subcultures, until recently, many marketers treated it as a homogeneous culture based primarily on Western European values. However, this view of America was never very accurate. Today, an array of racial, ethnic, nationality, religious, and regional groups or subcultures characterize American society. Subculture is a segment of a larger culture whose members share distinguishing values and patterns of behavior. The unique values & patterns of behavior shared by members of a subculture group are based on the social history of the group and its current situation.
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Relationship Between Culture and Subculture
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Subcultures Subculture members are also part of the larger culture in which they exist, and they generally share most behaviors and beliefs with the core culture. The most commonly described subcultures are ethnic groups. We are all members of several subcultures. As such, each subculture may influence different aspects of our lifestyle. For example: * Religious subculture: Most Muslims follow halal food standards. * Regional subculture: People from the south are less likely to consume low-fat milk than other U.S. regions. (Source: http://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=1061897)
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Boston.com is one of the strongest regional news Web sites.
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An ad showing many racial subcultures.
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Ethnic Subcultures Ethnic subculture: those whose members’ unique shared behaviors are based on a common racial, language, or national background. Non-European ethnic groups constitute 36% of the U.S. population in 2010. This percentage is expected to grow to 44% of the U.S. population by 2030. It is important to remember that all subcultures are very diverse, and general descriptions do not apply to all of the members. Successful marketing campaigns targeted at different ethnic groups must be based on a thorough understanding of the attitudes and values of each group. Source for ethnic subcultures: http://media.terry.uga.edu/documents/selig/buying_power_2008.pdf
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African Americans (Blacks) Constitute 13 percent of the American population. The Selig Center projects that African Americans’ (AAs) buying power * will rise from $318 billion in 1990 to $590 billion in 2000, to $913 billion in 2008, and to $1.2 trillion in 2013. AAs accounted for 8.5 percent of the nation’s total buying power. The total buying power of AAs from 1990-2008 grew faster than that of Caucasians (187% vs. 139%). Gains in AA buying power attributed to many factors, including: 1. increasing number of U.S. jobs; 2. greater number of AAs starting and expanding their own businesses; 3. higher levels of educational achievement among AAs; and 4. faster population growth rate than the total population * Note: The Selig Center defines buying power as disposable personal income.
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Chapters 5 & 6 - Consumer Behavior Chapter 5: The...

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