Lecture_2_1-_20-11

Lecture_2_1-_20-11 - Lecture-2 Charges can be accumulated,...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–9. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Wimshurst Machine Lecture-2 Charges can be accumulated, for example, by:
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Van der Graaf Generator
Background image of page 2
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Background image of page 4
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Ben Franklin (1752) Key on a kite string
Background image of page 6
The History of Electricity – A Timeline 1752 By tying a key onto a kite string during a storm, Ben Franklin , proved that static electricity and lightning were the same. His correct understanding of the nature of electricity paved the way for the future. 1800 First electric battery invented by Alessandro Volta. The ―volt‖ is named in his honor. 1808 Humphry Davy invented the first effective ―arc lamp.‖ The arc lamp was a piece of carbon that glowed when attached to a battery by wires. 1820 Separate experiments by Hans Christian Oersted, A.M. Ampere, and D.F.G. Arago confirmed the relationship between electricity and magnetism. 1821 The first electric motor was invented by Michael Faraday. 1826 Georg Ohm defined the relationship between power, voltage, current and resistance in ―Ohms Law.‖ 1831 Using his invention the induction ring, Michael Faraday proved that electricity can be induced (made) by changes in an electromagnetic field. Faraday’s experiments about how electric current works, led to the understanding of electrical transformers and motors. Joseph Henry separately discovered the principle of electromagnetic induction but didn’t publish his work. He also described an electric motor.
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
The History of Electricity – A Timeline 1832 Using Faraday’s principles, Hippolyte Pixii built the first ―dynamo,‖ an electric generator capable of delivering power for industry. Pixxi’s dynamo used a crank to rotate a magnet around a a piece of iron wrapped with wire. Because this devise used a coil of wire, it produced spikes of electric current followed by no current. 1835 Joseph Henry invented the electrical relay, used to send electrical currents long distances. 1837 Thomas Davenport invented the electric motor, an invention that is used in most electrical appliances today. 1839 Sir William Robert Grove developed the first fuel cell, a device that produces electrical energy by combining hydrogen and oxygen. 1841 James Prescott Joule showed that energy is conserved in electrical circuits involving current flow, thermal heating, and chemical transformations. A unit of thermal energy, the Joule, was named after him. 1844 Samuel Morse invented the electric telegraph, a machine that could send messages long distances across wire. 1860′s Mathematical theory of electromagnetic fields published. J.C. Maxwell created a new era of physics when he unified magnetism, electricity and l light. Maxwell’s four laws of electrodynamics (―Maxwell’s Equations‖) eventually led to electric power, radios, and television .
Background image of page 8
Image of page 9
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 25

Lecture_2_1-_20-11 - Lecture-2 Charges can be accumulated,...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 9. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online