Lecture_3_1-_25-11

Lecture_3_1-_25-11 - In principle, we can define the...

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In principle, we can define the electric field at some point near the charged object, such as point P in Fig. 22-1 a , as follows: We first place a positive charge q 0 , called a test charge , at the point P . We then measure the electrostatic force that acts on the test charge. Finally, we define the electric field at point P due to the charged object as FIGURE 22-1 (a) A positive test charge placed at point P near a charged object. An electrostatic force acts on the test charge. (b) ( b ) The electric field at point P produced by the charged object. The magnitude of the electric field at point P is , and the direction of is that of the force that acts on the positive test charge.
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In a way that the Verizon (or AT&T) uses in their language “how may bars are there?”. In Physics 22, you measure something called equipotential lines and then take the group of orthogonal lines to be the electric field lines. How do we measure the electric fields?
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The electric field is a vector field ; it consists of a distribution of vectors , one for each point in the region around a charged object, such as • a single charge • a pair of positive and negative charges (dipole) • a group of many charges • a line of charge • a charged disk, etc.
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12 F 21 ˆ ˆ r r 21 F Coulomb’s Law 1 2 21 12 21 2 21 21 1 9 2 2 1 ˆ ˆ ˆ ; 4 (4 ) 8.99 10 o o Q Q r F r r r rr where k NC M
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Z>>d Electric Dipoles
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Figure 22-35 HW 3-2 (HRW 22-12) Figure 22-35a shows two charged particles fixed in place on an x axis with separation L. The ratio of their charge magnitudes
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This note was uploaded on 02/07/2011 for the course PHY 21 taught by Professor Hickman during the Spring '08 term at Lehigh University .

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Lecture_3_1-_25-11 - In principle, we can define the...

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